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PostPosted: Wed Apr 28, 2010 4:24 pm    Post subject: Puerto Rico  Reply with quote




Puerto Rico  51st  State
April 28, 2010  
Congress pulling a fast one.
Congress will take up a bill to make Peurto Rico a state.  
Why is our Congress doing this now?  Secretly?  Quickly?
If it hadn’t been for one of Beck’s “Refounders” (a Congressional insider), would we even know about this?  
Why is this important to you and me?

Well, the word is out, and my local 9-12/Tea party organization sent this out this morning.
There is a bill to make Puerto Rico a state.
Again, they are trying to pull one over on us and on Puerto Ricans, who have consistently said they do not want to become a state.
Read below for more information (from Eagle Forum).
This was also discussed by Rep Tom Price on a conference call yesterday.

Please consider this:
* The U.S. would transform, overnight, into a bilingual nation.
At least half of Puerto Ricans do not speak English, the language of our U.S. Constitution and founding documents.
The Washington Times article, “Puerto Rican statehood,” analyzes all the implications of adding a foreign language-speaking state to the Union.

* It would bring immediate demands for massive federal spending.
The average income of Puerto Ricans is less than half that of our poorest state, and infrastructure and the environment are far below American standards.
Puerto Rico has a population with a median national income of $17,741, nearly a third of that for the U.S.

* Puerto Rico is already a democracy. Despite the bill’s deceptive title, Puerto Rico already has an elected government and exists as a self-governed commonwealth of the U.S.

* Statehood would give Puerto Rico more congressional representation than 25 of our 50 states!
It would inevitably give Demoncrats two additional U.S. Senators and 6 to 8 additional Members of the House.

H.R. 2499 is stealth legislation designed to lead to the admission of Spanish-speaking Puerto Rico as the 51st state, thereby making us a de facto bilingual nation, like Canada. The U.S. Congress should not be forcing Puerto Ricans to vote on statehood, especially since the Puerto Rican people have rejected statehood three times since 1991!

No Member of Congress who describes himself as a limited government, fiscal conservative should be casting a YEA vote for H.R. 2499, as Puerto Rican statehood would cause an immediate increase in federal expenditures, particularly for taxpayer-funded welfare state services.

Sponsored by Puerto Rican delegate Pedro Pierluisi (D), the Puerto Rico Democracy Act (H.R. 2499) – which has reared its ugly head a number of times over the past few congresses but has yet to have any success – would require Puerto Ricans to hold a national referendum to decide if they want Puerto Rico to remain a self-governing U.S. commonwealth, or become the 51st state.

The referendum would be set up as two plebiscites which would effectively deceive Puerto Ricans into voting for statehood. In the first round of votes, the Puerto Rican people would be given the choice between remaining a U.S. territory and “pursuing a different political status.” If the majority votes to maintain the status quo, this bill would require that Puerto Rico vote on this same issue every eight years.

If the majority votes for “different status,” a second round of votes would be held where Puerto Ricans would choose either statehood or independence-the status quo of “U.S. territory” would not even be an option! In other words, the two ballots would be rigged to favor the outcome of statehood, overriding the wishes of Americans and Puerto Ricans who want to maintain the current commonwealth status.
* Contact your US congressmen AND
* Take quick action here
http://www.capwiz.com/eagleforum/...ert/?alertid=14966151&type=CO
http://radiopatriot.wordpress.com...congress-to-move-fast-on-this-one

Internet rumors, Blog chat, vision, Puerto Rico
http://cj.myfreeforum.org/about4510.html

Puerto Rico Earthquakes
http://cj.myfreeforum.org/about650.html

HAARP activity
http://cj.myfreeforum.org/about1073.html


              Posted   <*))))><   by  


NEWs forum link
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 29, 2010 4:41 am    Post subject: COMMENTS Reply with quote

Comments
1.      This will lead to more taxes for Puerto Rico and why should they should what America has spent? Businesses will be taxed and regulated and on and on. Another big push by America to take over Puerto Ricans who have already made it clear they are HAPPY the way it is. Leave Puerto Ricans Alone! The newsatheist is the one who has been duped. Young, naive and idealistic but the brain has not matured yet…keep playing those computer games…duh!

Comment by Missy — April 28, 2010 @ 4:03 pm | Reply
  2.      [...] Puerto Rico – the 51st State? Congress to move fast on this one. [...]

     Pingback by WHAT REALLY HAPPENED | The Ruthless Truth blog — April 28, 2010 @ 3:13 pm
  3.         Pingback by Is Congress Pushing to Make Puerto Rico a State? | Impeach Obama Campaign — April 28, 2010 @ 2:39 pm | Reply

 4.      Sounds like someone goes to church at FOX news. Seems to me that most of the opposition comes from a racially motivated attitude towards Puerto Rico. We are already a nation of bilingual diviersity. Hello sketchy characters… we’re a nation based on immigration. You people with so much hate in your heart… Get a life or drop dead! VOTES YES…H.R. 2499… they already have US Passports… they are already considered Americans, we already send federal money to help them… so what a few more democrats are brought on board… the people have control to vote them in or out. The people do still have a right to revolt against the government don’t we? In political philosophy, the right of revolution is the right or duty, variously stated throughout history, of the subjects of a nation to overthrow a government that acts against their common interests.

     Comment by Momma Sugar Snatch — April 28, 2010 @ 2:27 pm |
         *            I have a neighbor who has a cousin named Daisy Dirty Leg. You two related?

      Comment by radiopatriot — April 28, 2010 @ 2:37 pm | Reply
                 Yes. Daisy Dirty Leg and I was both birthed by Susie Cream Cheese. We lived in a house owned by Mr. Meant-to.

                 Mr. Meant-to has a comrade and his name is Didn’t do. Did you ever have a chance to meet them? Did they ever call on you? These two fellows lived together in a House of Never-win. I am told that it is haunted by the ghost of Might-have been.

     Comment by Momma Sugar Snatch — April 28, 2010 @ 5:07 pm
  5.      New Atheist: So you do not beileve this? That is your choice. As to your comment on ‘older Americans’ it is us who are coming to aid of our country. It is the youth of this country that I find SADLY lacking in a fair and objective view of the news, and the world. The liberal progressives have control of the media and the schools and said agendas are dumbing down our kids and youth at an alarming rate. This is the end result of the libtarded, progressive diversity and multicultural public education from elementary school all the way up to the college level. I find tragic that the youth of this country are so easily swayed and fooled by a liar, cheater and poser such as the mullah obamaham. Keep drinking your Kool-Aid or might grow some actual brain cells. Maybe you should go to daily Kos or HuffyPo? You will find it more to your liking than reading the truth here.

     Comment by PatriotUSA — April 28, 2010 @ 1:44 pm
  6.      I’m a conservative, I love Glenn Beck, and I’m also a Puertorican. Unfortunately, Glenn and you are completely wrong on this. Your statement that the legislation “would require Puerto Ricans to hold a national referendum to decide if they want Puerto Rico to remain a self-governing U.S. commonwealth, or become the 51st state.” is factually incorrect. Maybe if you actually took the the time to read the legislation (like we criticize the liberals of not doing) you’d realize it.

     The Puerto Rico Democracy Act of 2009 – Authorizes the government of Puerto Rico:

     (1) to conduct a referendum giving voters the option to vote to continue Puerto Rico’s present political status or to have a different political status;
     (2) if a majority of ballots favor continuing the present status, to conduct additional such referendums every eight years; and

     (3) if a majority of ballots favor having a different status, to conduct a plebiscite on the options of becoming fully independent from the United States, forming with the United States a political association between sovereign nations that will not be subject to the Territorial Clause of the Constitution, or being admitted as a state of the Union.

     It is not a bill for people to vote between independence and statehood….and if you actually read the legislation in detail, in the event that statehood DOES win (which IMO is highly unlikely), does not bind the Congress to take any action. Puerto Rico is subject to the territorial clause of the Constitution, and as such, Congress has the last word on what happens in Puerto Rico.

     Obviously I question the timing of bringing this legislation up for a vote now, since it has been living in commitee limbo for the last 4 years or so, and every Congress has never let it see the light of day. It’s definitely a blatent attempt by Pelosi and company to pander to their hispanic base. However to blatently come out on national TV and say that Congress is voting on making PR a state is using the same kind of fear mongering tactics that we criticize the other side for.

     You and Glenn need to get your facts straight!
     Comment by Mike — April 28, 2010 @ 12:46 pm

From: Eagle Forum
           House will vote on Puerto Rican Statehood this week!
           Tell your Congressman to vote NO on the Puerto Rico Democracy Act (H.R. 2499) today!

           April 26, 2010
           Last Tuesday, the liberal House leadership pulled the controversial D.C. House Voting Rights bill from the floor schedule, and we thank you for all of your calls and for taking action! However, just two days after they backed away from the D.C. bill, the House announced that it would move to consider an even more controversial bill that paves the way for U.S. territory Puerto Rico to become the 51st state!

           Sponsored by Puerto Rican delegate Pedro Pierluisi (D), the Puerto Rico Democracy Act (H.R. 2499) – which has reared its ugly head a number of times over the past few congresses but has yet to have any success – would require Puerto Ricans to hold a national referendum to decide if they want Puerto Rico to remain a self-governing U.S. commonwealth, or become the 51st state.

           The referendum would be set up as two plebiscites which would effectively deceive Puerto Ricans into voting for statehood. In the first round of votes, the Puerto Rican people would be given the choice between remaining a U.S. territory and “pursuing a different political status.” If the majority votes to maintain the status quo, this bill would require that Puerto Rico vote on this same issue every eight years. If the majority votes for “different status,” a second round of votes would be held where Puerto Ricans would choose either statehood or independence-the status quo of “U.S. territory” would not even be an option! In other words, the two ballots would be rigged to favor the outcome of statehood, overriding the wishes of Americans and Puerto Ricans who want to maintain the current commonwealth status.

           Why we do not want Puerto Rico admitted as the 51st state:

           * The U.S. would transform, overnight, into a bilingual nation. At least half of Puerto Ricans do not speak English, the language of our U.S. Constitution and founding documents. The Washington Times article, “Puerto Rican statehood,” analyzes all the implications of adding a foreign language-speaking state to the Union.
           * It would bring immediate demands for massive federal spending. The average income of Puerto Ricans is less than half that of our poorest state, and infrastructure and the environment are far below American standards. Puerto Rico has a population with a median national income of $17,741, nearly a third below that for the U.S.
           * Puerto Rico is already a democracy. Despite the bill’s deceptive title, Puerto Rico already has an elected government and exists as a self-governed commonwealth of the U.S.
           * Statehood would give Puerto Rico more congressional representation than 25 of our 50 states! It would inevitably give Democrats two additional U.S. Senators and 6 to 8 additional Members of the House.

           H.R. 2499 is stealth legislation designed to lead to the admission of Spanish-speaking Puerto Rico as the 51st state, thereby making us a de facto bilingual nation, like Canada. The U.S. Congress should not be forcing Puerto Ricans to vote on statehood, especially since the Puerto Rican people have rejected statehood three times since 1991!

           No Member of Congress who describes himself as a limited government, fiscal conservative should be casting a YEA vote for H.R. 2499, as Puerto Rican statehood would cause an immediate increase in federal expenditures, particularly for taxpayer-funded welfare state services.

           Tell Congress not to override the wishes of Americans and Puerto Ricans who want to maintain the current commonwealth status of Puerto Rico by forcing a vote on rigged referenda!

           The House will likely bring H.R. 2499 to the floor for a vote on either Wednesday or Thursday of this week. Please call and email your Representative today and tell him to vote NO on H.R. 2499 which forces a vote on rigged referenda to make Puerto Rico the 51st state!

           Please concentrate on these targets* and send the indicated staffer a direct email asking them to explain why their boss is supporting this bill and stating that you want them to vote NO. Just a few emails from their own constituents would be enough to change a YES vote to a NO vote.

           *Even if you think you have a solid conservative representing your district, please contact him and tell him to vote NO. H.R. 2499 has approximately 50 Republican cosponsors-they need to hear from you!

           Comment by radiopatriot — April 28, 2010 @ 1:52 pm | Reply
  7.      So, what won’t you believe? Seriously? Is any claim too outrageous? And judging from the previous commenter’s website, I’m sure his information is as good as yours. As a young man, it makes me really sad that the older generation of American’s is so easily duped.

     Comment by TheNewAtheist — April 28, 2010 @ 11:19 am | Reply
  8.      You do not have to rely on Glenn Beck. Much of the news he reports on – including the Puerto Rico story – has already appeared in The Obama Timeline. (Part I is available from Amazon.com; Part II is at http://www.colony14.net.) Keep up with the Timeline and you’ll be a few days ahead of Beck… whose staff is one of the site’s frequent visitors.
http://radiopatriot.wordpress.com...congress-to-move-fast-on-this-one


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 29, 2010 4:45 am    Post subject: Democrats rigging Puerto Rico path to statehood? Reply with quote

DEMONcrats rigging Puerto Rico path to statehood?
House votes on option for island to become 51st state
April 28, 2010  *  WorldNetDaily

A move is afoot to grant statehood to Puerto Rico, and a vote in the U.S. House of Representatives tomorrow may put the island on a path to becoming the nation's 51st state.

Democrat Pedro R. Pierluisi, Puerto Rico's pro-statehood delegate to Congress and former co-chair of President Obama's 2008 presidential campaign in Puerto Rico,
is sponsor of H.R. 2499, the Puerto Rico Democracy Act. The act has 181 co-sponsors.

"When I introduced this bill, I pledged to undertake every effort to ensure that the people of Puerto Rico finally have the opportunity to
express themselves about the island's political status in a congressionally authorized vote," Pierluisi said last week.
"Like all the battles I have fought in Congress – from the allocation of ARRA funds for Puerto Rico, to the inclusion of the island in the health-care reform legislation –
I have not rested for a single moment. Today I am pleased to say that H.R. 2499 will have its day on the House floor, and I am confident that the legislation will be approved overwhelmingly."

Read the stunning report on how the unthinkable – the theft of an American election – may be on the horizon!

Under H.R. 2499, Puerto Ricans would vote on the issue of statehood yet again. Puerto Ricans have voted against statehood three times since 1967,
preferring their present status as an independent commonwealth in association with the U.S.

The last statehood vote, or plebiscite, held on Dec. 13, 1998, failed to yield a majority vote on any of the five options: enhanced commonwealth (0.29 percent),
statehood (46.4 percent), independence (2.5 percent), free association (0.06 percent) and none of the above (50.3 percent).

Rigging the voting process?
The commonwealth status allows the 4 million mostly Spanish-speaking Puerto Ricans to benefit from the protection of the U.S.,
but they are not required to pay federal income taxes on income they earn from island sources.
However, they do pay federal payroll taxes for Social Security and Medicare.
They currently do not vote in presidential elections and have non-voting representation in Congress.

However, some say statehood advocates are "rigging" the voting process to ensure Puerto Rico becomes a state.
In September, the New York Post reported Sen. Jose Hernandez-Mayoral of the island's minority Popular Democratic Party declared,
"Behind this innocuous bill lies a fully thought out assault on Congress to designate the island the 51st state. …
With the commonwealth option out of the ballot, statehood is finally, albeit crookedly, assured a victory."

The bill calls for a two-stage vote. In the first stage, Puerto Ricans would be asked to mark one of the following two options:

   1) Puerto Rico should continue to have its present form of political status. If you agree, mark here XX.
   2) Puerto Rico should have a different political status. If you agree, mark here XX.

"The clear hope is that those favoring full independence – which normally draws at most 5 percent of the vote – will combine with those favoring statehood, and outpoll those who want to remain a commonwealth," explains Eddie Garcia, member of the National Advisory Board of ProEnglish in his column published by the New York Post.

If voters choose to change political status, Puerto Ricans would be offered the following choices in a second vote:

   1) Independence: Puerto Rico should become fully independent from the United States. If you agree, mark here XX.

   2) Sovereignty in Association with the United States: Puerto Rico and the United States should form a political association between sovereign nations that will not be subject to the Territorial Clause of the United States Constitution. If you agree, mark here XX.

   3) Statehood: Puerto Rico should be admitted as a State of the Union. If you agree, mark here XX.

He explained that though electoral trickery, the people of Puerto Rico would be forced to essentially choose between statehood or independence on the second vote – possibly resulting in "a minority of Puerto Rican voters producing a false landslide vote for statehood."

Benefits of statehood

According to the General Accounting Office, half of all Puerto Ricans would qualify for food stamps and federal assistance under statehood.
"So Democrats are drawn to the prospect of a constituency likely to elect more Democrats to Congress," Garcia wrote. "Many Republicans are eager to sign on to the measure to show that they're 'pro-Hispanic.'"

In a recent commentary published by Roll Call, Roberto G. DePosada, former president of the Latino Coalition and senior adviser to the National Coalition of Latino Clergy and Christian Leaders, explained why he believes Puerto Rican politicians are rallying behind statehood.

"Why would Puerto Rican statehood leaders use such strong-arm tactics to force their way into the Union?" he asked. "One reason is that Puerto Rico's government is deeply in debt and its economy is weighed down by a bloated public employment sector. Its PNP-led government is desperate. It recently had to furlough 30,000 government workers, and it hopes for a bailout from the U.S. Treasury that it could not hope to get as a commonwealth."

He continued, "Language in the referendum bill's rationale is clear: 'The economic model under the unincorporated territory [e.g. Commonwealth] political system has collapsed and the government has not been able to guarantee the right to work of thousands of public employees who now find themselves in the unemployment line after being laid off.'"

Additionally, ProEnglish opposes H.R. 2499 because it does not contain a requirement for Puerto Rico to adopt English as its official language as a pre-condition for statehood.
"If Puerto Rico were admitted as a state it would destroy our nation's unity in English, and soon transform the U.S. into an officially bilingual country like Canada," the group warns.

Democrats stand to gain more seats
Ann Shibler of the John Birch Society explains that Democrats would like to see Puerto Rico become a state because they stand to gain more seats in Congress.
"Because of Puerto Rico's population, they could pick up many electoral votes as well, since more than 22 other states have smaller populations, which could in turn swing an election," she wrote.

In an article on RedState.com, Rep. Doc Hastings, R-Wash., said because Puerto Rico has a population of more than 4 million people, it would receive two U.S. senators and six or seven House seats.
"But as long as there is 435 seat maximum in the House, if Puerto Rico receives six seats, then other states expecting to gain a seat after the 2010 Census would lose representation," he explained.

Asked whether adding another state would mean substantial costs to the federal government, Hastings replied, "A new state would come with significant costs – spending that would measure in the billions of dollar a year."

A 1997 Heritage Foundation analysis by Edwin Feulner warned that Puerto Rican statehood would increase entitlement spending on welfare, Medicare and Social Security by an estimated $3 billion per year. Even if Puerto Ricans paid federal income taxes, the tax revenue would not be enough to offset the added expenditures.
"With an average per-capita annual income of about $7,600, few Puerto Ricans would be required to pay any income taxes at all," Feulner explained.
Today, the median national income is around $17,000.

In a report this week, the Heritage Foundation noted that the legislation allows non-resident Puerto Ricans to vote on statehood. The bill states: "… all United States citizens born in Puerto Rico who comply, to the satisfaction of the Puerto Rico State Elections Commission, with all Commission requirements (other than the residency requirement) applicable to eligibility to vote in a general election in Puerto Rico."

"Residency requirements may be waived, because Puerto Ricans living in the states would naturally favor statehood for the Commonwealth," The Heritage Foundation reports. "This provision allows non-resident Puerto Ricans to undermine the will of the residents of the Commonwealth."

The U.S. Census American Community
Survey reports more people of Puerto Rican decent live in the 50 states – more than 4.13 million – than live in Puerto Rico.
Hastings warned that many questions about the legislation have not been answered, and he believes the legislation is not ready for a vote.

"[T]here are a great many implications that aren't being considered or even discussed," he said. "Congress owes it to the citizens of the 50 states and to the people of Puerto Rico to have a full, open debate and resolve these questions before voting on this bill. If this doesn't happen, then representatives should vote 'No.'"
http://www.wnd.com/index.php?fa=PAGE.view&pageId=146949


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 29, 2010 1:26 pm    Post subject: Puerto Rican Statehood Ahead? Reply with quote

Puerto Rican Statehood Ahead?
April 28, 2010  
 By Glenn Beck
I want to talk to you about the fundamental transformation of America. It could happen tomorrow.
But first, you have to understand progressives. What is it that progressives believe?

• Big government, power and control: It's not about Democrats or Republicans, people. It's power and control. You can't choose for yourself. You're too dumb, so progressives will choose and regulate everything for you

• Democratic elections: This is important to progressives. You'll hear it "democratically elected" to refer to leaders like Hitler, Chavez and Castro — all democratically elected

• Social justice: Collective redemption through the government: Call it socialism, Marxism, whatever — it's all about the redistribution of wealth

Now, I want to talk to you about Puerto Rico. Understand: This is not about Hispanics. It's not about freedom. It's about power and control.
Puerto Rico is a self-governing commonwealth, but is subject to U.S. jurisdiction and sovereignty. It's been a U.S. territory since after the Spanish-American War of 1898. They're not an independent country. It's similar to Guam, the Virgin Islands and American Samoa. Some people like it, others don't; they get to enjoy many of the benefits of America — like protection — and they don't have to pay any taxes. That's a pretty sweet deal.

So it's no wonder "the people" have consistently voted against becoming America's 51st state; three times since 1967 — the latest in 1998. It's always been the same question: Do you want to be a state?

Now, let's take you to Washington, where there's important vote happening: HR 2499 — it's called "The Puerto Rico Democracy Act." Gosh darn it, who could be against that? The bill is a non-binding resolution, supposedly to support Puerto Rico's "self-determination" on if they want to be a state or not.

That's so cute. Wait, I thought they already had a right to vote? They do. So I'm left with the question: Why do they need a non-binding resolution to support their self-determination? Is there something going on that I'm not aware of that is so important that we need to take attention away from the economy or immigration?

We've asked some of the Republicans in Congress who are supporting this bill and here are some of the answers:

"This is a vote about freedom."
"This vote does not grant Puerto Rico statehood, it simply gives Puerto Ricans the right to determine if statehood is something they want for themselves."
See, I thought they already had that. Three times they voted on that. It's almost like something else is going on. But remember, they keep telling me it's "non-binding."

If I just trusted progressives. With progressives, democratic elections always comes with a trick. For instance, Hitler was democratically elected. But as the chancellor, not the fuhrer. Whether it be through parliamentary tricks or corruption, it's important to progressives to have the appearance of "the republic." Remember: They went through the democratic process for health care.

So what's the trick?
HR 2499 — if it passes — would force a yes or no vote in Puerto Rico on whether Puerto Rico should maintain the "current status" of the island. Wait, that's not a vote on statehood. That's a vote on do you want to "maintain the status quo."

Let me ask you this: Do you want to maintain the status quo of America? ACORN's Bertha Lewis would agree with me and say no, I don't want our current direction. But we would disagree on the reasons why.
See the trick?

In the past, statehood fails because some people like the status quo, some want to be a state and some want to be independent. There are too many choices, too many options. They need to unite people. Do you want to maintain the status quo unites them, not on the answer but on the question.

See, the folks that like the status quo are more likely to vote for statehood than independence.
In 1998, there were five options on the ballot: Limited self-government; free association; statehood; sovereignty and none of the above. Which one won? None of the above.

But now, the vote is going to happen in two stages. The first stage: Do you want to maintain the status quo? Then a chair is removed. The second vote leaves you with three choices: statehood; full independence or modified commonwealth.

Remember, full independence and modified commonwealth historically get less than 3 percent of the vote. So those options will be the only thing standing in the way of Puerto Rico becoming a state.

But Glenn, it's non-binding. Big deal!
True, but here's where if you don't know history, you are destined to repeat it. Let me introduce something to you called the Tennessee Plan. (This is probably going to sound like a conspiracy theory, but I have one thing the conspiracy theories never have.)

OK — so the Tennessee Plan, you've probably never heard of it unless you are from Tennessee or Alaska. Apparently, some of those who took an oath to protect and defend the Constitution haven't heard of it either. When Tennessee first came to the Union, it had a different name; it was first called "Territory of the United States South of the River Ohio." It was a U.S. territory, just like Puerto Rico is now.

But instead of waiting for Congress to decide if they wanted to make the territory a state, they took a different, bold route: They forced the issue themselves:

• They elected delegates for Congress
• They voted on statehood
• They drafted a state constitution
• And applied for statehood

• Then, when Congress dragged their feet, they went to the Capitol and demanded to be seated
Congress was unsure of how to proceed; this was the first territory going for statehood. They relented and Tennessee became America's 16th state. Alaska did many of the same things.

Again, the Tennessee plan in a nutshell:
• Unsuccessfully petitioning Congress for admission
• Drafting a state constitution without prior congressional intervention
• Holding state elections for state officers, U.S. senators and representatives
• In some cases, sending the entire congressional delegation to Washington to demand statehood and claim their seats
• Finally, Congress has little choice but to admit a new state through the passage of a simple act of admission

Congressmen, voting for HR 2499 are like sheep being led to slaughter. They'll say the people of Puerto Rico have a right to vote for themselves. They'll vote yes. The progressives will then present a false choice to the people. Instead of saying "do you want to be a state?"it's "Do you want the status quo?" If voters vote no, the next vote removes the status quo from the ballot, leaving statehood against two far less popular options. They'll vote yes for statehood. Then they'll elect their congressman and senators, they'll demand to be seated and a 51st star will be attached to the flag.

How could this happen? Look at the immigration debate. What are Arizona and Texas being called? Racists. Anyone opposing Puerto Rico as state 51 would be called a hatemonger. Why do you hate Puerto Ricans so much? Why do you hate freedom?

This is not about Hispanics or freedom or sovereignty. It's about power and control. If progressives convince Hispanics that everyone besides progressives are racist, you'll have their vote for 60 years. But it's more than that.

Why are Democrats and Republicans for this? Because it's not about Republicans and Democrats. The progressives in our country know that this is the moment they've been waiting for; every Marxist daydream they've ever had, now is their time to get it done. They are not going to let it pass.

That's what's happening: The fundamental transformation of America. And this is only the beginning.
I told that this sounds like a conspiracy theory. But who is orchestrating this effort in Puerto Rico? Lo and behold, the New Progressive Party; from their own party platform:

"The New Progressive Party adopts the Tennessee Plan as an additional strategy for the decolonization and the claim for the admission of Puerto Rico as the 51st State of the United States of America."

And: "This shall be done through legislation which will establish a process for the adoption and ratification of the Constitution of the State of Puerto Rico, and the election of two senators and six federal congresspersons to appear before Congress in Washington D.C. to claim their seats and the admission of Puerto Rico as the 51st State of the United States of America."

They're going to paint this as a vote for freedom, but Puerto Rico has already voted and they've already spoken. When they send the delegates to Washington, if you stand against this you'll be labeled a racist.
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,591683,00.html


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 29, 2010 1:29 pm    Post subject: Statehood for Puerto Rico, House vote Reply with quote

House to Vote on Bill That Could Lead to Statehood for Puerto Rico
April 29, 2010
The U.S. House is voting Thursday on a bill that allows the government in Puerto Rico to ask its residents if they want to change the island’s commonwealth status, in what critics are saying is a backdoor attempt to force Puerto Ricans into choosing U.S. statehood.

Puerto Rican voters repeatedly have shot down the idea of statehood over the past several decades, but the bill under consideration would call on the commonwealth to continue bringing the question before the voters.
Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, said that while Puerto Rico doesn't need congressional authorization to hold such a nonbinding vote, the bill could be a game-changer.

He described the effort as part of a plan to give the island's progressive activists "legitimacy" to push forward with and build momentum toward a statehood plan. He said it's something most Puerto Ricans don't even want, but suggested it was part of an effort to bring more Democrats into Congress.
"That's what some of us who understand this bill are so just frightened about," Chaffetz told radio and Fox News host Glenn Beck. "The majority of people in Puerto Rico don't even necessarily want this."

The bill sets out a two-stage process. First, a referendum would go to Puerto Ricans asking whether they want to change their political status or keep it the same. If they vote to stay the same, the bill authorizes Puerto Rico to call the question for a vote every eight years.

If they vote to change their status, then it would allow Puerto Ricans to pick from one of three options: independence from the United States, a different kind of "political association between sovereign nations" or U.S. statehood.
The vote is nonbinding, and even if Puerto Ricans chose statehood, the U.S. Congress would have to approve it.

There's an advantage for Puerto Ricans to opt out of statehood. Under the territory's current status, residents pay no federal tax on income earned inside Puerto Rico. They do not vote for president or have a voting representative in Congress. But they participate in the presidential primary process and have a non-voting delegate in the House of Representatives, like the District of Columbia.

Chaffetz said the bill would allow Puerto Rico and the United States to push forward with plans for a 51st state with just a "very, very small margin" in support of the idea. From there, he said, a slate of new senators and representatives would be coming to Washington.
Chaffetz said 2.5 million people born in Puerto Rico but living in the continental U.S. would also be allowed to weigh in on the vote.
"That is just absolutely unbelievable to me. I just can't believe that they are going to allow somebody who's now living in Chicago to be voting on this bill in Puerto Rico," he said.

Rep. Luis Gutierrez, D-Ill., whose parents were born in Puerto Rico and who represents part of Chicago, slammed the bill on the House floor Thursday morning, calling it a device to "impose" statehood on residents who have repeatedly rejected the idea.

"Really it's designed to get one thing and one thing only, and that is to have the people of Puerto Rico accept statehood for themselves," he said. "Why don't we accept their wishes? … It's spelled the same in English as in Spanish: N-O. No. No."

But the bill has scores of sponsors in the House from both sides of the aisle. It was introduced by Pedro Pierluisi, Puerto Rico's representative in the House and a member of the New Progressive Party in Puerto Rico, which advocates for statehood. Pierluisi said Thursday that the bill addresses a "longstanding problem."
"Patience is a virtue, but my people have been patient enough," he said.

Backers of the bill say it's a critical step toward supporting Puerto Ricans in setting their own future.
"The bill is based on the most fundamental democratic principle -- the right to self-determination," Rep. Jared Polis, D-Colo., said on the floor Thursday. He said that while Puerto Ricans are U.S. citizens, they deserve to have "several congress-people with full voting rights" representing them.

A letter from Democratic and Republican representatives this week urged colleagues to support the bill.
"The U.S. citizens of Puerto Rico have never expressed their views, in the context of a vote sanctioned by Congress, on the island's political status. This contradicts our nation's commitment to democracy and self-determination," the letter said.
http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2...ntial-vote-puerto-rican-statehood


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 29, 2010 1:32 pm    Post subject: PUERTO RICO STATEHOOD Reply with quote

PUERTO RICO STATEHOOD
April 29, 2010
Apparently there is to be a vote later today on a bill regarding Puerto Rican statehood. They are calling it “non-binding” but it is not non-binding! It is a trap. The bill makes eventual Puerto Rican statehood a virtual certainty. This is despite the fact that statehood has been voted down repeatedly. The Puerto Rican people don’t want it!

But since when has that stopped the Left from ramming what they want down people’s throats? And why do they want this? The same reason they want everything, to further entrench their power. Statehood would mean two new senators, six or seven new representatives, a whole slew of new voters and tons of opportunities to spend more of your money. As Examiner.com’s Robert Moon points out:

   Due to its dense population of poverty-stricken minorities, Puerto Rico can be counted on to vote overwhelmingly for Democrats and all their handouts, and their representation will also consequently outnumber that of 25 other existing U.S. states.

   Meanwhile, with Puerto Ricans having an average income of less than half that of our poorest state, they will instantly become eligible for dozens of our welfare programs. Truckloads of taxpayer dollars will also have to be perpetually dumped into the territory, by federal law, to bring it up to American infrastructure and environmental standards.

Oh, and never mind us. We don’t get a say in this either. Puerto Rico, which doesn’t want statehood, is being forced to vote, while we American citizens, who have a vested interest in the outcome, will not be given the opportunity to vote! Simply incredible!

HR 2499, titled “A Bill, to provide for a federally sanctioned self-determination process for the people of Puerto Rico” follows a very devious, underhanded multi-step path to essentially force Puerto Rican voters to eventually adopt statehood. Here’s how.

The bill first authorizes Puerto Rico to hold a vote where they are given the following two choices only:

  1. Puerto Rico should maintain its current political status.
  2. Puerto Rico should have a different political status (Different political status. These vague words are exactly as in the bill.)

So citizens get to choose 1 or 2. Period, no ifs, ands or buts. Then the bill stipulates what comes next:
If the people pick option 1 – which they have chosen multiple times already – then the Puerto Rican government is directed to conduct more plebiscites every eight years for the foreseeable future. So in other words, Mr. Puerto Rican citizen, we are going to keep cramming this down your throat until a majority of you choose option 2.

Once the people choose option 2, then there will be a second vote with the following three options:

  1. Full independence.
  2. Sovereignty “in association with the United States…” not subject to the Constitution’s Territorial Clause.
  3. Statehood.

For the record, the first two options will not get much support. So the entire structure of the bill is designed to funnel Puerto Rican voters into a predetermined outcome: Statehood. This despite the fact that Puerto Ricans have voted against statehood over and over again!

Rep. Luis Gutierrez, a senior Democrat Congressman no less, just posted his views on this bill at Huffington Post. Here is what he has to say about it:
   I am a senior Democratic Member of Congress, whose parents were born in Puerto Rico, and for whom Puerto Rico self-determination has been – and remains – a central issue of my congressional career. This statehood bill is the opposite of self-determination.

   It is designed to craft an artificial majority for statehood where none exists now. Every time the people of Puerto Rico have been consulted on this issue through a plebiscite they’ve said NO to Statehood. NO to Statehood in 1967. NO to Statehood in 1993. NO to Statehood in 1998. This should be called the “Don’t you dare say NO to Statehood Bill”.

But he is just getting going. Listen to this:
   When a similar Puerto Rico bill came up under Speaker Newt Gingrich’s Republican controlled Congress a decade ago, it was the product of lengthy and thorough hearings and an open and fair process. Then, I was given time to offer seven amendments. Then I was able to clarify the bill for the Puerto Rican people. Then, each of my seven amendments got 30 minutes of floor time for debate.

   Flash forward to now. Now a Democratic Majority Congress is only allowing me two of the 16 amendments I offered in the Rules Committee on Wednesday. Now I only have 10 minutes to debate each one.

   Now, under Democratic Leadership, we get one hearing, no forewarning, no companion Senate bill, and a debate only a few seconds longer than a NASCAR pit-stop…I get more time to debate renaming a Post Office than I will get to debate a bill that could make Puerto Rico the fifty-first state.

   In my opinion, this bill is the political equivalent of a shady Goldman Sachs derivative: It’s secretive. It lacks transparency. It’s likely to blow up down the road and cause systemic risk to out democracy. And those who put this political derivative together don’t really tell you what this is really about and will play dumb when it explodes.

We all know now from the outrageous experience of Obamacare that leftists could care less what the will of the people is. For those of you who traditionally vote Democrat this should serve as a warning: that includes you! Even if it’s those poor, downtrodden Puerto Ricans the Left claims to want to help so much. Ram Obamacare down Americas’ throat; ram statehood down Puerto Rico’s throat.

Do I detect a pattern here?
This information needs to go viral. Congress needs to be shut down with phone calls and faxes starting first thing in the morning. That is today, April 29, 2010.

All this is going on while everyone is distracted by the monstrous financial bailout bill coming out of the Senate. The timing was deliberate! And we now hear that despite losing support from lone RINO Republican Lindsey Graham, the Democrats are going to go ahead with illegal immigrant amnesty.

So now we see a pretty comprehensive electoral strategy mapped out:

  1. Naturalize 12 million illegal aliens to vote Democrat
  2. Universal voter registration
  3. Do away with Electoral College using state-by-state approach
  4. Force Puerto Rican statehood
  5. Soros-funded Secretary of State project to help steal close elections
  6. Stimulus monies as political slush fund

If you’re not sufficiently angry and alarmed now, there is no hope for you. These people are demonstrating right to our faces their willingness to trample our rights and defy our will. If they are willing to do this now, what will they do if they get the permanent majorities they want?
http://biggovernment.com/jmsimpso...4/29/puerto-rican-statehood-today


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 30, 2010 6:30 am    Post subject: House Approves Puerto Rico Statehood Measure Reply with quote

House Approves Puerto Rico Statehood Measure
April 29, 2010
The House voted to allow Puerto Ricans to change the island’s commonwealth status, in what critics are saying is a backdoor attempt to force Puerto Ricans into choosing U.S. statehood
something Puerto Rican voters already have rejected 3 times.

The bill, which passed 223-169 and now must be taken up by the Senate, would introduce a two-step ballot measure for Puerto Rico to decide if its residents want to change their current relationship with the United States.
If they vote to change their status, they can then choose to become a state, pursue independence, or seek some other "political association between sovereign nations."

Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, said that while Puerto Rico doesn't need congressional authorization to hold such a nonbinding vote, the bill could be a game-changer -- part of a plan, he said, to give the island's progressive activists "legitimacy" in a push toward statehood. Chaffetz suggested it was part of an effort to bring more Democrats into Congress.
"That's what some of us who understand this bill are so just frightened about," Chaffetz told radio and Fox News host Glenn Beck. "The majority of people in Puerto Rico don't even necessarily want this."

Puerto Rico became a U.S. territory at the end of the Spanish-American War. Those born on the island were granted U.S. citizenship in 1917 and Puerto Rico gained commonwealth status in 1952.
Today, Puerto Ricans serve in the military but can't vote in presidential elections. They do not pay federal income tax on income earned on the island.

Proponents of the new measure say it gives citizens of the island the right to self-determination.‬‪ ‬‪Thursday's action was nonbinding, and if Puerto Ricans eventually select statehood, Congress would still have to vote to admit the island to the union as the 51st state.‬‪ ‬‪

The issue divided Democrats and Republicans alike as liberal Democrats with ties to Puerto Rico teamed with conservative Republicans to oppose the measure.
Rep. Luis Gutierrez, D-Ill., whose parents were born in Puerto Rico and who represents part of Chicago, slammed the bill on the House floor Thursday morning, calling it a device to "impose" statehood on residents who have repeatedly rejected the idea.

"Really it's designed to get one thing and one thing only, and that is to have the people of Puerto Rico accept statehood for themselves," he said. "Why don't we accept their wishes? … It's spelled the same in English as in Spanish: N-O. No. No."

The divides were particularly stark among members of the House Republican leadership team. House Minority Leader John Boehner,R-Ohio, voted against the legislation. Meantime, House Minority Whip Eric Cantor, R-Va., and Republican Conference Chairman Mike Pence, R-Ind., voted in favor.

Puerto Rico Gov. Luis Fortuno (R) cobbled together more than 50 Republican sponsors in favor of the package.
But there was drama as the majority Democrats narrowly avoided an upset on the House floor.
Republicans attempted to add provisions to the legislation that would have made English the official language of a potential Puerto Rican state.
Republicans also tried to modify the bill by banning any infringement of the Second Amendment in Puerto Rico.
The Democratic majority defeated the GOP effort, 198-194.
Fox News' John Brandt and Chad Pergram and The Associated Press c
http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2...hood-measure/%20/?test=latestnews


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 30, 2010 7:18 am    Post subject: House votes to allow Puerto Rico to choose status Reply with quote

House votes to allow Puerto Rico to choose status
April 29, 2010  
A vote in the U.S. House of Representatives today has put Puerto Rico one step closer on a path to becoming the nation's 51st state.
The House passed H.R. 2499, the Puerto Rico Democracy Act, on a 223-169 vote. Now the Senate will take up the measure.

Puerto Ricans have voted against statehood three times since 1967, preferring their present status as an independent commonwealth in association with the U.S. Under H.R. 2499, Puerto Ricans will vote on the issue of statehood yet again.

The last statehood vote, or plebiscite, held on Dec. 13, 1998, failed to yield a majority vote on any of the five options: enhanced commonwealth (0.29 percent), statehood (46.4 percent), independence (2.5 percent), free association (0.06 percent) and none of the above (50.3 percent).

The House adopted two amendments. One allows an option on the second ballot for voters to select a continuation of the current commonwealth status. The second adopted amendment requires the Puerto Rico State Elections Commission to:

   * ensure that ballots in the plebiscite include the full content of the ballot written in English.

   * inform everyone voting in the plebiscite that, if Puerto Rico were to maintain its current political status or become a state, it would be subject to the official language requirements of the federal government.

   * inform everyone voting in the plebiscite that it is the sense of Congress that if Puerto Rico were to maintain its current political status or become a state it would be in the best interest of the U.S. to promote the teaching of English in Puerto Rico.

Puerto Rico's current commonwealth status allows the 4 million mostly Spanish-speaking Puerto Ricans to benefit from the protection of the U.S., but they are not required to pay federal income taxes on income they earn from island sources. However, they do pay federal payroll taxes for Social Security and Medicare. They currently do not vote in presidential elections and have non-voting representation in Congress.

The bill calls for a two-stage vote. In the first stage, Puerto Ricans would be asked to mark one of the following two options:

1) Puerto Rico should continue to have its present form of political status. If you agree, mark here XX.
2) Puerto Rico should have a different political status. If you agree, mark here XX.

If Puerto Ricans decide to change the status, they can choose statehood, independence or to seek another "political association between sovereign nations." If they select statehood, Congress will vote on whether to admit Puerto Rico as the 51st state.
http://www.wnd.com/index.php?fa=PAGE.view&pageId=147661


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 08, 2012 4:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Puerto Ricans opt for statehood
November 7, 2012  
Puerto Ricans favor statehood for first time.
Puerto Rico votes on whether to change relationship with US, elects governor and legislators.
Puerto Rico votes for U.S. statehood in non-binding referendum.

A slim majority of Puerto Ricans sought to change their ties with the United States and become the 51st U.S. state in a non-binding referendum that would require final approval from Congress.
The two-part referendum asked whether the island wanted to change its 114-year relationship with the United States. Nearly 54 percent, or 922,374 people, sought to change it, while 46 percent, or 786,749 people, favored the status quo. Ninety-six percent of 1,643 precincts were reporting as of early Wednesday.
The second question asked voters to choose from three options, with statehood by far the favorite, garnering 61 percent. Sovereign free association, which would have allowed for more autonomy, received 33 percent, while independence got 5 percent.
President Barack Obama earlier expressed support for the referendum and pledged to respect the will of the people in the event of a clear majority.
It is unclear whether U.S. Congress will debate the referendum results or if Obama will consider the results to be a clear enough majority.
Puerto Rico's resident commissioner Pedro Pierluisi, who has championed statehood, did not return calls for comment. He received 48 percent or 874,914 votes, while his opponent, Rafael Cox Alomar, received 47 percent or 855,732 votes with 96 percent of precincts reporting.
The island is currently a U.S. territory whose inhabitants are U.S. citizens but are prohibited from voting in presidential elections. Its resident commissioner in the U.S. House also has limited voting powers.
The future of the island's political status, however, also is dependent on who governs the island.
According to partial election results, pro-statehood Gov. Luis Fortuno was ousted by a razor thin margin by an opponent who supports the island's current political status.
With 96 percent of precincts reporting, challenger Alejandro Garcia Padilla with the Popular Democratic Party received 48 percent or 870,005 votes. Fortuno, a Republican and leader of the New Progressive Party, received 47 percent or 855,325 votes.
Fortuno has not issued comment, while Garcia celebrated what he called a victory.
"I can assure you we have rescued Puerto Rico," Garcia said. "This is a lesson to those who think that the well-being of Puerto Ricans should be subjected to ideologies."
http://www.cnn.com/2012/11/07/politics/election-puerto-rico/index.html
http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-202_1...atehood-in-non-binding-referendum
http://www.foxnews.com/world/2012...ses-governor-some-polls-open-late
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-20238272

Sad

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