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Legalization of pot - Marijuana
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BornAgain2



Joined: 12 Dec 2009
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2016 1:17 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote

https://www.yahoo.com/news/califo...ion-marijuana-030418535--nfl.html
California gets go-ahead to vote on legalization of marijuana
6/29/16

(Reuters) - Californians are set to decide whether to make recreational marijuana use legal, as other Western states have done, after the California Secretary of State's office said on Tuesday the issue could be put to voters in the November ballot.

The proposed so-called "Adult Use of Marijuana Act," which is supported by Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom among others, would allow people aged 21 and older to possess as much as an ounce of marijuana for private recreational use and permit personal cultivation of as many as six marijuana plants.

"Today marks a fresh start for California, as we prepare to replace the costly, harmful and ineffective system of prohibition with a safe, legal and responsible adult-use marijuana system that gets it right and completely pays for itself," initiative spokesman Jason Kinney said in a statement.

The measure would also establish a system to license, regulate and tax sales of marijuana, while allowing city governments to exercise local control over or disallow commercial distribution within their borders.

The initiative required just over 402,000 valid signatures to qualify for the ballot and exceeded that number on Tuesday, the Secretary of State's office said. Secretary Alex Padilla is slated to certify the initiative on June 30.

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BornAgain2



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PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2016 6:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://www.yahoo.com/news/high-c...des-employee-fired-164315626.html
8/19/16
High court sides with employee fired for smoking pot at work


HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — A Connecticut state worker fired after he was caught smoking marijuana on the job was punished too harshly and should get his job back, the state Supreme Court ruled Friday.

Gregory Linhoff was fired from his maintenance job at the University of Connecticut Health Center in Farmington in 2012 after a police officer caught him smoking pot in a state-owned vehicle. He had no previous disciplinary problems since being hired in 1998 and had received favorable job evaluations, according to his union. He was arrested, but the charges were later dismissed.

State officials said firing the New Hartford resident was the only appropriate penalty for his conduct and not doing so would send a bad message to other employees. An arbitrator disagreed and overturned the firing, saying Linhoff instead should be suspended without pay for six months and be subject to random drug testing for a year after he returned to work.

The state appealed and a Superior Court judge overturned the arbitrator's decision on the grounds that it violated Connecticut's public policy against marijuana use. Linhoff's union, the Connecticut Employees Union Independent SEIU, appealed the judge's ruling to the Supreme Court.

All seven justices agreed that the lower court judge was wrong to overturn the arbitrator's ruling, saying that while state policy on drug use in the work place allows for firing workers it does not require it. Justices also said that judicial second-guessing of arbitration awards is uncommon and should be reserved only for extraordinary circumstances.

"The misconduct at issue was completely unacceptable, and we do not condone it," Chief Justice Chase T. Rogers wrote in the decision.

"By the arbitrator's estimation, (Linhoff's) personal qualities and overall record indicate that he is a good candidate for a second chance," Rogers wrote. "Moreover, the discipline the arbitrator imposed was appropriately severe, and sends a message to others who might consider committing similar misconduct that painful consequences will result."

Linhoff couldn't be reached for comment Friday. A phone number for him could not be found.

His lawyer, Barbara Collins, said the Supreme Court ruling is important because it acknowledges the value of upholding decisions made in arbitration, which was designed as a way to settle disputes out of court.

"Perhaps as important the court acknowledged whether directly or indirectly that there is a public policy of rehabilitation and second chances which should be recognized in the work place," she said.

A spokeswoman for the state Attorney General's Office said officials are reviewing the ruling and they declined further comment.

At the time Linhoff was fired, he was seeking treatment for depression, stress and anxiety because his wife had filed for divorce and he had a cancer scare; he believed smoking pot helped to alleviate his worries, Collins said.
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BornAgain2



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PostPosted: Thu Sep 01, 2016 9:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/ma...Ox?li=BBmkt5R&ocid=spartandhp
The price of pot is tumbling in Colorado
9/1/16

Colorado's weed is getting much cheaper.

In October last year, the cost of a wholesale pound of cannabis in Colorado was around $2,400 to $2,600. That price has almost been cut in half to between $1,400 and $1,600 last month, according to data from Tradiv, an online marijuana distribution platform.

"In less than a year, we’ve seen wholesale prices drop to nearly half of their previous totals," John Manlove, the director of sales at Tradiv told Business Insider in an email. "We’ve never seen prices like this."

The reason prices are dropping so rapidly is because the market is getting flooded. Growers are building scale and ramping up production of the plant.

Manlove explains that this has to do with the way cities in Colorado, like Denver, regulate the recreational marijuana market.

In May, Denver's municipal government extended a moratorium on granting licenses to new retail dispensaries as well as marijuana cultivation facilities.

This has allowed a "minority of large cannabis business owners" to buy up and consolidate the remaining licenses, says Manlove.

And, without strict "canopy limits" (the amount of plants one facility can grow) the influx of marijuana into the Colorado market will continue to cause prices to drop, says Manlove.

Thus, Colorado growers, with few limits and access to a huge market, are able to build an economy of scale, reducing prices across the board.

Though low prices are good news for consumers, dispensaries will have to cope with lower profit margins on raw marijuana flowers.

According to Headset, a cannabis intelligence platform, the highest margin products for dispensaries are those that make marijuana easier to consume, like edibles, beverages, and pre-rolled joints.

If these trends continue, raw marijuana will only continue to get cheaper. And it's likely that the retail market will adapt by pushing further into such higher-margin products.
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honestwoman



Joined: 11 Nov 2014
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2016 7:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

fact is, marijuana is just a plant. It is supposed to be a herbal remedy that was abused that is why it became illegal. If there will be a way to monitor it, just like prescription medicine, why not?
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BornAgain2



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PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2016 6:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/ma...rP?li=BBmkt5R&ocid=spartandhp
The next 14 states to legalize marijuana
9/23/16

In 2013, only 7% of American adults said they were marijuana users. Today, less than three years later, usage rates have nearly doubled, as 13% of U.S. adults say they smoke pot -- according to a recent Gallup poll. Despite what appears to be growing acceptance of the drug, the DEA recently reiterated marijuana’s classification as a Schedule 1 substance, in the same category as heroin, LSD, and ecstasy.

Reflecting the increasing acceptance of the drug, and in direct conflict with the DEA’s conclusion, some states have dialed down their marijuana laws in recent years. Prohibited across the country less than five years ago, marijuana is now legal and regulated in Alaska, Colorado, Oregon, Washington, and the District of Columbia. While it may be too early to gauge the social and economic impact of full scale legalization in these places, more than a dozen other states could foreseeably repeal marijuana prohibition in the coming years.

24/7 Wall St. revisited last year's list of states most likely to legalize recreational marijuana. We again reviewed current marijuana laws as well as legislative processes in each state. The path to legalization is long, complex, and often very different in each state. Changing circumstances led to the addition of several states, including Arizona and Illinois, while Minnesota was the only state on last year’s list that was not included this year.

A state's legislative process is an important factor in the state's path towards legalization of marijuana. In an interview with 24/7 Wall St., Morgan Fox, senior communications manager with Marijuana Policy Project, a marijuana legalization advocacy group, explained, “Traditionally, voters have been far ahead of politicians when it comes to supporting marijuana policy reform.” As a result, states that allow ballot initiatives, through which statutes and constitutional amendments can be proposed by voters, are more likely to legalize marijuana sooner than states that do not allow ballot initiatives.

The four states that have legalized recreational marijuana use have done so through ballot initiatives. And this November, voters in Arizona, California, Maine, Massachusetts, and Nevada will also vote on ballot initiatives that would repeal prohibition of the drug.

However, just over half of states do not allow such ballot initiatives, and many lawmakers perceive marijuana reform as too politically risky. According to Fox, this is beginning to change. In many states, including Vermont and Rhode Island, voters are not likely to punish politicians for being perceived as soft on drugs if they are in favor of marijuana law reforms. In states such as these, possession of a small amount of pot is already decriminalized and marijuana use is legal for those with certain medical conditions.
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BornAgain2



Joined: 12 Dec 2009
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 15, 2016 7:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/...ational-medical-marijuana-n665771
These Nine States Will Vote on Legalizing Recreational and Medical Marijuana
10/14/16

Nine states have marijuana measures on the ballot this November, and chances are good that many will pass — giving pot advocates high hopes that the federal government will eventually lift its nationwide ban.

In five states — Arizona, California, Maine, Massachusetts and Nevada — voters will decide on legalizing the recreational use of marijuana.

In four others — Arkansas, Florida, Montana and North Dakota — voters will weigh in on medical marijuana, which is already legal in nearly half the country.

As Election Day approaches, polls and research show rising support for marijuana legalization: 57 percent of U.S. adults say marijuana should be made legal, compared to just 32 percent a decade ago, found a Pew study earlier this week.

Supporters say the shift in attitude is in part thanks to successes in Colorado and Washington, the first states where voters approved recreational marijuana in 2014.

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BornAgain2



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PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2016 10:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.cnn.com/2016/11/07/hea...ijuana-legalize-ballot/index.html
Five states consider legalizing marijuana

11/7/16

(CNN)On this election day, voters in five states will get to decide whether marijuana should be legal to use recreationally.

It's on the ballot in California, Massachusetts, Maine, Arizona and Nevada. Voters will also decide whether it should be used for medical reasons in three other states.

The drug is still illegal under federal law, but it has grown in popularity over the years. The number of adults who have smoked weed has nearly doubled in three years, according to a Gallup poll released in August.

It is the No. 1 illicit drug of choice for Americans, according to the 2014 National Survey on Drug Use (PDF), although only one-third of users reported an addiction to the substance, unlike most all the other illicit drugs used.

Currently, it's legal to use recreational marijuana only in four states and in the District of Columbia. Colorado and Washington state voted to OK it in 2012. Alaska and Oregon voters approved it in 2014. Medical marijuana is legal in half of US states and is on state ballots this year in Montana, Florida and North Dakota. It will be on the ballot in Arkansas, but the results won't count after the state supreme court struck the issue in October, due to invalid signatures.

For the states where recreational use is legal, it seems to have been a boost to the economy. The marijuana industry created more than 18,000 full-time jobs last year and generated $2.39 billion in economic activity in Colorado, according to an analysis from the Marijuana Policy Group (PDF).
There have also been some health consequences. Emergency rooms have seen a significant increase in adult marijuana-related exposure cases.

The number of calls to poison control centers involving Colorado children has gone up, as has the number of children who've been taken to the hospital for treatment due to unintentional marijuana exposure, studies show. There have also been more school suspensions, marijuana-related traffic deaths, pet poisonings and lab explosions.

Here's what's on the ballot.
California
If marijuana becomes legal in California, the world's sixth-largest economy and the country's most populous state, it could have the biggest impact on the national scene.

In 1996, the state was the first to make medical marijuana legal.

A "yes" on Proposition 64 would make it legal for people 21 or older to use it recreationally. There would be a 15% sales tax, and its cultivation would be taxed. The money would be used in part to study drug research, to study treatment and to help with enforcement of the law.

The state's two largest newspapers back the measure, as does the California Democratic Party, while Republicans are against it.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi told the Los Angeles Times Friday that she plans to vote in favor of it. That makes Pelosi the highest-ranking, sitting elected official in either political party to support legalizing a drug the federal government currently considers a Schedule 1 narcotic. A Schedule 1 narcotic is a drug with no currently accepted medical use and has a high potential for abuse. The category also includes heroin.

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BornAgain2



Joined: 12 Dec 2009
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 09, 2016 3:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://www.yahoo.com/news/legali...9-states-173232422--election.html
California voters approve recreational marijuana
11/8/16

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — California voters approved a ballot measure Tuesday allowing recreational marijuana in the nation's most populous state, handing the legalization movement its biggest victory yet.

A preliminary exit poll conducted for The Associated Press and television networks by Edison Research showed the measure passed handily.

Voters in eight other states also considered proposals Tuesday to expand legal access to the drug, which is still forbidden by the federal government.

California's vote makes the use and sale of recreational cannabis legal along the entire West Coast, giving the legalization movement powerful momentum. That could spark similar efforts in other states and put pressure on federal authorities to ease longstanding rules that classify marijuana as a dangerously addictive drug with no medical benefits.

In addition, Massachusetts voters also legalized the recreational use of marijuana.

California was the first state to approve medical marijuana two decades ago. It was among five states weighing whether to permit pot for adults for recreational purposes. The other states were Arizona, Maine, Massachusetts and Nevada.

Florida and North Dakota earlier approved medical marijuana measures Tuesday. Arkansas was considering a similar measure and Montana voted on whether to ease restrictions on an existing medical marijuana law.

In general, the proposals for recreational pot would treat cannabis similar to alcohol. Consumption would be limited to people 21 or older and forbidden in most public spaces. Pot would be highly regulated and heavily taxed, and some states would let people grow their own.

State-by-state polls showed most of the measures with a good chance of prevailing. But staunch opponents that included law enforcement groups and anti-drug crusaders urged the public to reject any changes. They complained that legalization would endanger children and open the door to creation of another huge industry that, like big tobacco, would be devoted to selling Americans an unhealthy drug.

The California proposal sowed deep division among marijuana advocates and farmers. In Northern California's famous Emerald Triangle, a region known for cultivating pot for decades, many small growers have longed for legitimacy but also fear being forced out of business by large corporate farms.

"I'm not necessarily stoked nor surprised," said Humboldt County grower Graham Shaw, reflecting the ambivalence of the region to the measure. "I am very happy that the war on cannabis in California is finally over."

Advocates opposed to the measure were joined by more traditional voters who opposed legalization on moral grounds.

"I'm against it because you're going to get more and more problems if you legalize it," said Joanne Hsu, 86, a lifelong Republican from Walnut Creek who also voted for GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump.

If "yes" votes prevail across the country, about 75 million people accounting for more than 23 percent of the U.S. population would live in states where recreational pot is legal. The jurisdictions where that's already the case — Alaska, Colorado, Oregon, Washington state and the District of Columbia — have about 18 million residents, or 5.6 percent of the population. Twenty-five states allow medical marijuana.

According to national polls, a solid majority of Americans support legalization.

Proposition 64 would allow people 21 and older to legally possess up to an ounce of weed and grow six marijuana plants at home. Varying tax rates would be levied on sales, with the money deposited into the state's marijuana tax fund.

The exit poll of 2,282 California voters was conducted for AP and the television networks by Edison Research. This includes preliminary results from interviews conducted as voters left a random sample of 30 precincts statewide Tuesday, as well as 744 who voted early or absentee and were interviewed by landline or cellular telephone from Oct. 29 through Nov. 4. Results for the full sample were subject to sampling error of plus or minus 4 percentage points; it is higher for subgroups
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BornAgain2



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PostPosted: Wed Nov 09, 2016 12:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://www.yahoo.com/tech/m/960f...the-united-states-of-weed%3A.html
The United States of Weed: Election results for legal marijuana
•November 8, 2016

While most eyes have been set on the presidential race during the 2016 election, Arizona, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada and California all held a vote to legalize recreational marijuana, a decision that could potentially shift the nation on a cultural and economic level.

Paving the road ahead of them, Alaska, Colorado, Oregon and Washington have all  legalized, regulated and taxed marijuana for recreational use by adults, similar to laws that govern alcohol use. Additionally, Washington D.C. also legalized cannabis possession and cultivation for personal use. If all five states pass their ballots, cannabis will be legal for nearly one-fifth of the US population.

Massachusetts passes recreational marijuana

Question 4 passed in Massachusetts, which will allow people 21 and older to use,  grow and possess marijuana. The ballot was extremely close leading up to the final results, which definitely kept plenty of cannabis enthusiasts in the state on the edge of their seats.

   #Breaking: Mass. voters have approved #Question4 legalizing recreational marijuana, the AP projects. #Electionnight https://t.co/nJfWSpwDW5 pic.twitter.com/OmQE86KLFm

   — The Boston Globe (@BostonGlobe) November 9, 2016

The measure specifies that people would be allowed to possess one ounce of cannabis in public and a whopping 10 ounces of pot at home, which is a shitload of weed. The measure will also create the Cannabis Control Commission that will oversee legalization and issue licenses for those who wish to sell marijuana products.

For reference, here's Tommy Chong holding 10 ounces of pot at medical marijuana dispensary Shango.

Image: Shango Las vegas

Additionally, the initiative will impose a modest 3.75 percent tax on top of Massachusetts sales tax, and will allow cities and towns to impose an additional 2 percent tax. Funds will go towards helping the state establish the new law and commission.

Question 4 states that legalization will take place on December 15, 2016. It should be a great Christmas and New Year in Massachusetts this year.
California votes for Recreational Marijuana

Proposition 64 passed in California, which will allow people 21 and older to possess and consume marijuana for recreational purposes. Adults will be allowed to hold one ounce of marijuana, and grow up to six plants in a secure area out of public view.

The measure will create two new taxes, one for cultivation and another for retail. The taxes will pay for the cost of administering the new law in addition to raising funds for youth substance abuse education, law enforcement training with a focus on DUI enforcement and environmental cleanup and restoration of public land damaged by illegal marijuana cultivation.

   Recreational marijuana will effectively become legal tomorrow in California. Prop. 64 passes. https://t.co/NsrR5Hxnbv pic.twitter.com/SnuTK2Rssn

   — Los Angeles Times (@latimes) November 9, 2016

Proposition 64 passing in California isn't too surprising considering the state was the first to deregulate marijuana for medical use in 1996. The state also has some of the most relaxed qualifying symptoms, making it relatively easy for patients to receive treatment.
Nevada votes for recreational marijuana

Question 2 passed in Nevada, according to ABC News, which allows adults 21 and older to possess, purchase, cultivate and consume marijuana. Adults will be allowed to possess up to one ounce of cannabis, and those who don't live within 25 miles of a retail store will be able to grow up to six plants in an enclosed and locked area.

The measure also creates a 15 percent excise tax, which will be paid by licensed cultivators. Funds will first be used to implement the measure as well as regulation, and anything leftover will go to support public K-12 education.

   Massachusetts and Nevada have voted in favor of legalizing marijuana, @ABC News projects based on vote analysis. https://t.co/ZU99KLLCWu

   — ABC News Politics (@ABCPolitics) November 9, 2016

Arizona votes against recreational marijuana

According to NBC affiliate 12 News, Arizona is projected to vote against Proposition 205 to legalize recreational marijuana. The full results are still coming.

   #BREAKING: Voters reject legal marijuana in Arizona, AP says. #Prop205 pic.twitter.com/AuNoqBOKuh

   — 12 News (@12News) November 9, 2016

Maine still too close to call.

By the earlier morning hours on Wednesday, with 90 percent of the vote reporting, Maine favored legalization of recreational marijuana with 50.3 percent voting in favor and 49.7 percent voting against.

The slim margin of the results, a scant 4,500 votes, has kept official sources from called the race. We will update here when it's called.
Medical Marijuana

In addition to the recreational vote, Florida, Montana, North Dakota and Arkansas also voted to allow qualifying residents with their doctor's recommendation access medical marijuana treatment, joining 25 states that have already developed medical marijuana laws.

Florida votes in favor of medical marijuana

   #Florida passes medical marijuana ballot measure by 71%. 9 states voting on marijuana laws today. #Vote2016 #ElectionNight

   — Rhana Natour (@RNatourious) November 9, 2016

North Dakota votes in favor of medical marijuana

   North Dakota becomes the latest state to allow medical #marijuana! pic.twitter.com/Q5MZDkB9Uu

   — MPP Marijuana Policy (@MarijuanaPolicy) November 9, 2016

So what's next?

While Massachusetts has a clear date when the laws will go into effect, it's going to take some time before you'll be purchasing legal weed from any of these states. Regulations need to be set, agencies need to be formed and most importantly, the public as well as law enforcement need to be educated. Thankfully, the four states that have already regulated recreational marijuana have set standards, acting as an experiment for the states that follow.

Results for Maine are not yet in

This story is currently developing ...

Additional reporting by Peter Allen Clark
Topics: election day 2016, Legalization, Watercooler

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