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CJ

Richmond bald eagles nest 2012




Richmond Virginia bald eagles nest 2012
UPDATE APRIL 2014

This nest had some problems, but both young survived.
The parents moved the following year to an island.
I have had no word on these 2 young, they were not banded.


     


Dave McRuer fed both Richmond chicks
PHOTO credit Richmond Times-Dispatch
http://www2.timesdispatch.com

April 16, 2012  Eagle Cam Community,
I wanted to take an opportunity to update you directly on what is going on with the Richmond pair and to reflect on the broader project and community that we have all been a part.  I apologize for not writing to you earlier but our focus has been on the welfare of the chicks and we have been working around the clock to insure their safety.

We have been monitoring activity at the nest during all daylight hours since Friday.  The adults have been in the area observing the chicks but did not enter the nest until this morning.  The female flew in to feed the chicks at 7:30 followed by the male that brought in 2 fish in succession.  We will continue to monitor the pair until we are convinced that the chicks are being cared for adequately.  We will provide you with regular updates on their progress.

From a management perspective, we have been following a single track aggressively while preparing 2 contingency plans.  Our first choice is always that chicks remain in this nest and be raised by their parents.  We worked to give the adults every possible opportunity to raise this brood.  On Friday and Saturday we took the unusual step to hydrate and feed the chicks by hand to give the adults more time to commit.  We have been prepared to continue this assistance for a reasonable period of time.  If the parents would not care for the brood, our first contingency was to foster the chicks to other parents on the James.  These are wild birds and our first choice would be to keep them this way.  Fostering chicks into other broods is a common management practice that has been used for decades.  In preparation for this, I flew on the upper James on Friday evening to identify nests with a single chick that were of the same age as this brood.  We selected 2 nests that could receive the chicks if necessary.  The second contingency would be to have the chicks raised in captivity and there is no better place for this option than the Wildlife Center of Virginia.  We are relieved that these contingencies do not appear to be necessary.

I wanted to express my thanks to the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, the Wildlife Center of Virginia, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for our ongoing consultation on this pair.  All pitched in and provided all support possible.  I do not believe that enough of us recognize what a fine community of committed wildlife professionals we have here in our region.

The Richmond Eagle Cam was a project initiated by the Center for Conservation Biology at the College of William and Mary/The Virginia Commonwealth University, and the Richmond Times Dispatch.  Beyond the research component of this project, our sole objective was to educate and engage the public about a species within our own town.  The Center continues to be committed to that mission.  As a society, we protect what we know and cherish.  I have been fortunate enough to spend my entire life working with birds.  Often, observing  their ecology is like standing on the rim of the Grand Canyon.  It is a profound experience that is not easily described.  It was our hope that bringing this experience to the public would familiarize and educate people about this dramatic species and in doing so engender a concern for its welfare.

I am sad that this project has come to an end but I am greatly encouraged by the signs of life that it kindled.  Throughout this experience, I have been excited by the level of interest within Richmond and beyond.  It has been a clear message that a significant portion of our community cares deeply about the other species with which we share the James.  The excitement of school groups about this pair has been an unexpected joy.  These children hold the future of our natural world in their hands.  I want to thank all of the educators who have included this pair in their classes and who are the key to how future generations relate to the environment.

Lastly, I wanted to thank the property owner and Richmond neighborhood where this pair resides for sharing their pair with the broader community.  From talking to the neighbors I have come to realize that this pair is a priceless jewel for them.  I ask you to have the decency to respect their privacy as you would have others respect yours.

Sincerely, Bryan Watts
Center for Conservation Biology
CJ

Eagle parents return to feed their chicks
April 16, 2012
The two Richmond eagles that left their nest last week returned this morning and fed their two chicks.
“Both are back to a normal pattern, tending the chicks
,” said eagle expert Bryan Watts.
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...ing-for-parents-return-ar-1844770
http://www.facebook.com/pages/CCB...Eagle-Nest-Camera/195741607187952
.
CJ

Dr Dave McRuer, director of veterinary medicine at the Wildlife Center of Virginia, a wild-animal hospital in Waynesboro
April 16, 2012  WVC blog
A professional tree climber climbed up the nest tree, not  Dave.

Dr. Dave: Hello everyone!

On Friday afternoon, Dr. Brian Watts from the Center of Conservation Biology, called seeking advice on the health of the Richmond eaglets.
I was informed that the adults had not been to the nest in over 24 hours and Brian was considering removing the chicks and fostering them into other nests.
He asked if I was available to come to meet them and make sure the eaglets were doing OK.

Here was the plan for Friday April 13
While Dr. Watts was out flying looking for suitable nests, I prepared a med kit in order to give fluids and perform physical exams on the birds.
While I usually have a stocked med kit in the car, I didn't have enough fluids for both eaglets as I was working from home that day.
Luckily, my wife is an equine vet and was able to lend me some from her stocked vet truck!

Martha and I headed down to the nest and met CCB biologists Libby Moneka and Mike Wilson and tree climber Rus Barth.
While Rus was preparing to climb to remove the chicks, we all noted that the two adults were still in the area and obviously irritated by our presence.
We even noted that one of the adults made a low nest flyover with legs extended but refused to land.
Based on this new information, we all decided that permanently removing the eaglets from the nest was premature.
Instead, the eaglets were temporarily removed to assess their health and to feed and administer fluids.

Both birds were in relatively good condition. On Friday, both birds were mildly dehydrated based on the stings of mucous found in the mouth.
The smaller male eaglet (R2) was examined first and it was quiet, mild - moderated responsive attitude, and generally had a slumped posture.
It had some muscle over the keel but was relatively under-conditioned for a four week old bird.
When offered food, the male would not take fish from the tongs necessitating the food to be force fed directly into the crop.
The larger female (R1) was a different story. She was in great body condition, feisty, alert, and easily took as much food as I offered directly from the tongs.
No force feeding for that bird!

On Saturday, the female reacted the same way as the day before however, there was a major improvement in the smaller male (R2) .
The eaglet was more alert, inquisitive about its environment, and took fish from the tongs for the first several bites.
I did have to force feed most of the meal however, it was clear that the fluids and food from the day before had a positive impact


These birds were a little smaller and less developed than the ( 2011 NBG ) eaglets that were admitted to WCV last year.
According to biologist Dr. Brian Watts, the birds were not as developed as eaglets in other nests at this time of year.

Hydrating the chix
Because we were going to be feeding the eaglets after giving the fluids, we didn't want to put any fluids into the mouth.
The next best place to give fluids in birds is under the skin where is it absorbed into the blood vessels really quickly.
I used a small needle connected to a tube which was connected to my syringe filled with appropriate fluids.
I then delivered the fluids under the skin on the inner thighs where they made a a little pocket.
These fluids were absorbed from these pockets within the hour!

The birds were fed chopped chunks of shad (mud shad?) diligently prepared by CCB biologist and sushi master Mike Wilson.
And no, The fish was freshly filleted and kept on ice before the feeding. I didn't realize that our little feeding session was being filmed.
I accidentally said "cooked" instead of "cut" and you all got to see the blooper reel!
Just before the comment, Mike Wilson and I had been joking about how he's going to be a sushi chef for eagles Smile

I gave a fluid called Lactated Ringers Solution which is a fluid that is balanced (buffered) to be in the same state as the blood.
These fluids can easily travel throughout the blood vessels and then travel through cell membranes to get into all the needed cells of the body.
Some other kinds of fluids like to stay in the blood vessels where they affect blood pressure.
As these eaglets were healthy, the later fluid type was not needed.

Q  - How long were the eaglets out of the nest during the exam, feeding
On Friday night, I had to perform physical exams, give fluids, and feed the eaglets which took about 25 minutes to do both birds.
On Saturday, I only had to give fluids and food so the health exam took about 15 minutes for both.

Q - What spooked the parents to stay away so long?
That's a good question but I'm really not the best person to speculate on wild eagle behaviour.
I also don't have a complete picture on what was happening in the nest, with the parents, with the camera, with the neighborhood, with the weather conditions, etc.
I'll have to defer the "Why" questions to Dr. Brian Watts at the Center of Conservation Biology.
He's the expert on wild eagle behaviours, I'm just the medicine guy Smile

Q - What spooked the parents?  DrDave doesnt know - I'm just the medicine guy Smile
On Friday night, my wife Martha accompanied me to the nest site to hold the eaglets will I performed physical exams, administered fluids under the skin, and fed the eaglets.
On Saturday, friends and falconers Dr. and Mr. Eva and Andrew King joined me to perform the same task.

Q - Were the eaglets vocalizing?  
Dr. Dave: Oh yes!  These are wild eagles and certainly not used to being held, being poked, and being manipulated.
They were generally quiet when not being handled, preferring to lie down and blend in with the background.

It really was a great experience helping with the Richmond eaglets. Given all the possible outcomes, this really was the best ending possible.
The adults are back and feeding the chicks, CCB biologists will continue to monitor to make sure that the birds are acting in a normal manner,
and we've all got to learn from this family and be part of its development for a short time.
It is always rewarding working with colleagues in the wildlife field and collaborating on projects and responses to ensure that wildlife health is coordinated.
Despite the cam being taken away earlier than expected, I'd say this was a very successful project.

PHOTO credits
Wildlife Center of Virginia

 

.
CJ

Eagle parents Virginia and James return to feed chicks
April 17, 2012   RICHMOND, VA
Eagles Virginia and James have returned to their nest, and they are feeding their chicks with a frenzy.
After unexpectedly leaving the nest Friday, worrying scientists and legions of Richmond Eagle Cam fans, the birds flew back Monday morning with three fish.
"They seem to be back in their routine," said eagle expert Bryan Watts.

Watts had planned, if the parents did not return, to put the chicks in other eagle nests along the James.
The four birds had been the stars of the Eagle Cam, but workers took down the camera Saturday in case it was somehow spooking the birds. The Eagle Cam showed archived video Monday.

Virginia flew into the nest Monday about 7:30 a.m. and fed the chicks a fish that a Watts co-worker had left in the nest Saturday.
A short time later, James flew in with a fresh fish, flew back to the James River, caught another fish and dropped that in the nest.
Before long, he brought in a third.

They are making up for lost time!
Watts and other scientists would continue to watch the eagles closely until the chicks take wing around mid-June.
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...nia-and-james-return-t-ar-1847223



.
CJ

BRIEF RECAP of WHAT HAPPENED in APRIL 2012

Richmond Eaglets The First 18 Days 4-11-12  989razzle
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R8ra92Eup1I

Sunset snacktime  *  Richmond Eagle Cam video April 9, 2012  Monday
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...m-sunset-snacktime-49959-vi-36489

Cam image April 12, the Last Night of Camera.  It was removed April 14
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U64oyHoJmKo

Richmond eagles nest cam broke April 12
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...hmond-eagle-chicks-97362-vi-36683

The adults haven't abandoned the nest, but have not feed their chicks since April 12th.
No one understands why.  Did someone frighten them?  We dont know.
Eagles may be urban but they are still wild birds.

There are reports of a trespasser on private property where the nest is.

Experts feed Richmond eagle chicks April 14, 2012 Saturday
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...hmond-eagle-chicks-97362-vi-36683


Eagle parents bring in more fish for chicks April 17, 2012  Tuesday
The eagles seem to have settled into a normal feeding routine, as shown in this image, captured from video before the Richmond Eagle Cam was taken down.
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...bring-more-fish-chicks-ar-1848408

It's feast time in Richmond eagle nest April 18, 2012  Wednesday
Eagle parents Virginia and James seem to be celebrating their return with a feast.
Both eagles brought in more fish Tuesday after bringing in fish Monday to end a 3 day absence from their nest. Their two chicks are gobbling up the sudden bounty.
"It seems like a lot of food coming in," said Bryan Watts.
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...in-richmond-eagle-nest-ar-1849933

Eagles continue to do well, daily watch called off April 19, 2012
The former Richmond Eagle Cam birds are doing so well that their human observers are stepping aside.
Scientists called off their daily nest watches, but they will still check on Virginia and James and their two chicks from time to time.
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...o-well-daily-watch-cal-ar-1852787


I have been blogging 3 nests, NBG, Decorah and Richmond
I split Richmond off to put here.
The NBG nest had no eggs in 2012 but what a wild history making year with male charming 3 females!
http://cj.myfreeforum.org/ftopic2340-42.php

2012 Bald Eagle Nesting Season - never a dull moment!
I hate to split that up!  But I will break the 3 nests down, add Richmond here over time.  check back!  Smile
http://cj.myfreeforum.org/about2340.html

Epitaph for an Eagle
2011 NBG nest female killed, 3 chicks raised by WVC and released
http://cj.myfreeforum.org/about1921.html

NX, one of the 2011 NBG chicks on transmitter
She was hit by a car in Dec and is recovering at WVC, hoping for release soon
http://cj.myfreeforum.org/about2186.html

Eagles killed by man and man's stuff
http://cj.myfreeforum.org/about2015.html

CREDITS
Dr. Bryan Watts, CCB
Dr. Dave, Wildlife Center of Virginia
http://www.ustream.tv/user/CntrConsBiology-CCB
http://www.ustream.tv/richmondeagles

OK folks, I began this thread with the ending.  An odd way to do things I know!  Smile
Now following is the history from where I began watching them after Reese Lukei, CCB told the NBG blog Richmond egg had a pip, a hole!

HISTORY  *  March-April 2012
CJ

   

Ricmond Virginia eagles nest 2012


          Hatching is hard work!

March 16, 2012  

March 16, 2012 Richmond VA first eagle chick hatched - From Pip to Hatch, it tumbled out on its head, took awhile to get its big feet out.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2j1tL5yTLM4
CJ

   


March 17-18, 2012  

R1 chick hours old Richmond eagle March 17
R1 chick 24 hours old Richmond eagle March 17


   


Decorah and Richmond eaglecams have eggs - and the Richmond chicks just hatched

R2 chick hatches Richmond eagle March 18 dawn

Female Richmond eagle brought a huge bloody fish to nest.  YUK.
its interesting to watch a chick hatch .. its hard work to hatch - the struggle to LIVE
It appeared the female nudged the chick R2 a few times after it was out of the shell.
Male brought another huge fish to nest

Left - dawn,  2 images right, 3pm  Male feeding both hatchlings.  The one who hatched today is the lower one.
He just cant keep his head up more than a few seconds.
I am amazed how AGGRESSIVE R1 is!  Both beating up on R2 and even trying to climb the side of the nest bowl.

Richmond Eagles Second Eaglet Hatches March 18-12 7:31am EDT
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1c6ZsRta8wQ

Hatching is hard work!  Richmond first eagle chick hatched Friday
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2j1tL5yTLM4

Poop Shoot
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PJsevfI-P-M&feature=youtu.be
http://www.facebook.com/pages/CCB...741607187952?sk=wall&filter=1
CJ

March 22, 2012  
Chick R2 shot poo on R1's back.  They are growing and eating well.

Richmond Eaglets First 7 Days March 22, 2012
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C8x2mhZNqdM&feature=youtu.be

Richmond Eagle Nest
http://www.facebook.com/pages/CCB...Eagle-Nest-Camera/195741607187952


March 27, 2012  
Mod said there is a lack of food, R2 may not survive  Sad

CJ

 
 


March 29, 2012  
Richmond 29March 9 am
R2 chick has been pecked up pretty bad by chick R1
but new darker down grows in inside 3 weeks, so they should have new coats by Easter
Bottom right screen pic - see the nestlings ear behind its eye?  Smile
CJ

 


March 31, 2012  
CJ

April 14,  2012  
Richmond eaglecam was not working for days, techs tried to fix it, causing the eagle parents NOT to return to the nest to feed their chicks.
April 13 a CCB biologist and a wildlife vet went to the nest. The biologist climbed the tree, removed the eagles for hydration and feeding.
Richmond chicks fed by biologist who climbed nest tree.  They were observed self feeding. They ate all they fish left on the nest.

Dr. Watts April 14
The adult eagles are still perched in the trees nearby the nest. They have defended the nest against any intruders and obviously their instincts are still intact.
Chicks were assessed by the vet and are totally healthy. Dr. Watts has decided to eliminate any distractions from the adults,
so he is going back up tonight to take down the camera and the chicks will be fed again.
He wants to give these chicks every opportunity to be raised by their parents.


Richmond eagles nest cam broke April 12 so Dr Dave, WVC and Dr Watts removed cam, fed chix April 14
ASTONISHED HOW BIG those chicks are!

http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...hmond-eagle-chicks-97362-vi-36683

Richmond Eagles blog, public
http://www.facebook.com/pages/CCB...Eagle-Nest-Camera/195741607187952

Cam image April 12, the Last Night of Camera.  It was removed April 14
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U64oyHoJmKo
CJ

April 14,  2012  --   TROUBLE  

Richmond eagles nest cam broke April 12 so Dr Dave, WVC and Dr Watts removed cam, fed chix April 14
ASTONISHED HOW BIG those chicks are!

http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...hmond-eagle-chicks-97362-vi-36683

CCB EAGLES
http://ccb-wm.org/virginiaeagles/eaglevideo.html

April 15, 2012 Richmond eagles

Bryan Watts, director of CCB
Vet Dr. Dave McRuer, director of veterinary medicine at the Wildlife Center of Virginia, a wild-animal hospital in Waynesboro

Vet feeds eaglets April 13, 2012  Friday
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...ientists-say-theyre-ok-ar-1842760

Eagle Cam comes to end; chicks being fed by hand April 14
The Richmond Eagle Cam came to an abrupt end Saturday as scientists dismantled the equipment to eliminate any distraction that might be keeping the parent birds from feeding their chicks.
The crisis erupted Friday when the parent birds didnt return to the nest to feed their two chicks.

Experts fed the chicks by hand Friday night and late Saturday afternoon. The plan now is to keep the area around the nest quiet so that the parents resume feeding the chicks.
Bryan Watts hopes that these birds will now come back.

If not, Watts plans to put the chicks in the nest of other eagles along the James River. Eagles will care for chicks that aren't theirs. The chicks could be moved as soon as today.

Parent birds soared and cackled above the nest as cam people took cam down.
They are still responding.

Dave McRuer gave chix fluids through a tube placed just under the skin.
Birds snapped up the chopped fish offered with a forceps.

It's unclear why Virginia and James aren't feeding the chicks. The adults haven't abandoned the nest, because they continue to fly and perch nearby.
It's possible that workers on the ground trying to repair the Eagle Cam spooked the birds last week.
Watts said the parents behavior was mystifying. Watts was proud of the way the Eagle Cam brought nature to the public but was clearly distressed about how the project ended.
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...end-chicks-being-fed-b-ar-1843259

UPDATE  April 15, 2012
Virginia and James (Richmond eagle parents) continue to show interest in their nest, giving scientists hope that the birds will soon resume feeding their two chicks.
If the parents do not resume the feedings soon, eagle expert Bryan Watts plans to put the chicks in other nests along the James River.
Eagles will care for chicks that are not theirs.
They will NOT remove the chicks today, giving the parents at least another day to return to the nest.
James perched near the nest this morning, and Virginia continues to fly nearby.
We can't justify pulling the chicks as long as they are showing interest of this sort.
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...-may-resume-feeding-ch-ar-1844196


Eagle chicks may be moved to other nests
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...being-fed-may-be-moved-ar-1841463

Dave McRuer fed both Richmond chicks
PHOTO Richmond Times-Dispatch

   

April 16, 2012  RICHMOND eagles
The eagle parents fed their chicks this morning! [/size]
I emailed Dr. Bryan Watts and got and email back very fast.
Email from Dr. Watts - Parent eagles fed thier chicks this morning!
Bryan Watts letter April 16
http://cj.myfreeforum.org/about3100.html

Dr. Watt and the Richmond Times newspaper collaborated on eaglecam.
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...ing-for-parents-return-ar-1844770
CJ

It's feast time in Richmond eagle nest
April 18, 2012
Rex Springsten  rspringston@timesdispatch.com
Eagle parents Virginia and James seem to be celebrating their return with a feast.
Both eagles brought in more fish Tuesday after bringing in fish Monday to end a three-day absence from their nest. Their two chicks are gobbling up the sudden bounty.

"It seems like a lot of food coming in," said Bryan Watts, director of the Center for Conservation Biology, a research group.
Virginia and James unexpectedly left their nest Friday, worrying scientists and fans. Experts fed the chicks by hand Friday and Saturday.

The parents, who continued to fly and perch in the area, returned to the nest Monday. Now, Watts said, "things seem to be on track."
Watts and his co-workers plan to monitor the nest until the chicks take flight in mid-June.
The 4 eagles had been the stars of the Richmond Eagle Cam, which drew more than 1.5 million page views from more than 130 countries.

Workers took down the camera Saturday as they sought to remove anything that might be bothering the parents. The Eagle Cam website now shows archived videos of the birds.
The Eagle Cam was a project of the conservation center and the Richmond Times-Dispatch.
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...in-richmond-eagle-nest-ar-1849933

Eagles continue to do well; daily watch called off
April 19, 2012

The former Richmond Eagle Cam birds are doing so well that their human observers are stepping aside.
Scientists called off their daily nest watches, but they will still check on Virginia and James and their two chicks from time to time.
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...o-well-daily-watch-cal-ar-1852787
CJ

From CindyLou:
Cindy Haskell
I like the rest of you waited with worry and a hopeful heart for Mom & Dad’s return to the nest.
Late Sunday Night we got a call that my brother in-law (Mark 49 yrs old) had suffered a severe asthma attack and gone into cardiac arrest.
They were able to revive him but not before him sustaining severe brain damage,
they had him on life support so they could run test to see if he qualified to be an organ donor (per his wishes).

With a sleepless night and a heart so tight and heavy it felt like it would break I signed on to the cam early Monday to check on our eagles.
I can hardly explain how my heart felt like it opened up and sad tears to joy instantly to find that Mom & Dad had returned to the nest.
I felt an Inner Peace and a feeling of life renewed. I went into to chat to celebrate and wait for any updates with the rest of you.

I can’t Thank all you Mods and Chatters enough for (unknowingly) helping me thru a very difficult day.
Mark passed away immediately after being taken off life support, unfortunately he was not a candidate for them to be able to use his organs.
Although I grieve for him, I take comfort in knowing that Mark is now Soaring with the Eagles.
I thank you in advance for your well wishes I know things will get easier.
Always remember to show your Love to those you care about each and everyday.
Truly appreciative, Cindy Lou
Posted April 19, 2012
CJ

 

April 20 -21 PHOTOS by oxbarb, center for conservation biology
http://www.flickr.com/photos/57766413@N05
http://www.flickr.com/photos/57766413@N05/7098851029/in/photostream

Little masked bandit heads peekin over nest rail sending us gratitude for our James Riverdance when they were in trouble!  Smile

For those curuious about the CATALINA California nest, click to page 5 of my 3 nests and scroll down to April 21 but dont if you dont want to know nature
http://cj.myfreeforum.org/ftopic2340-56.php
ElishevaChaya

If you want to enjoy eagles all year round you might want to get a delightful book on eagles, Eagle Christian:

http://www.amazon.com/Eagle-Christian-Kenneth-Price/dp/0962122416
You can buy it used or new and the book is not a lengthy read.  

Celeste
CJ

Dr. Bryan Watts, director Center for Conservation Biology
April 20
 2:00 pm  chatroom
Dr. Watts gave a quick update and then replied to presubmitted questions.

It has been our great pleasure to be with you this spring and to share in watching the activities of this pair.  
We appreciate your interest in this pair and eagle ecology in general.  
As of about 10 minutes ago, the female is perched on her favorite limb and the chicks are doing fine.  
We are working on a way to provide regular updates on the chicks for you so stay tuned.

1:04 obxbarb: Ok, I will start with the questions now.

graycsam: Can you ask Dr. Watts how the cam being down will affect the grad students research?

DrWatts-ccb: Courtney continues to make direct observations of the nest onsite and continues to have a distant camera to monitor intrusions.
She was able to record the video feed from the nest camera for the duration of the incubation period and the first month of brood rearing.  
These development periods were the most important for her work.

JenCharlottesville: I was surprised that the eagles didn't go after the person who took out the eaglets.
Do eagles usually bother people in the nests for banding and such, or do they know they can't stop it?


DrWatts-ccb: Bald Eagles are amazingly passive toward humans.  
Unlike peregrine falcons, red-shouldered hawks and other raptor species that do defend nests, bald eagles typically will observe but not approach.
I have never been attacked by an adult eagle around the nest.

RICeagles-Dr. Watts indicated that R1 and R2 were smaller than what is to be expected at this age for VA Chesapeake Bay eagles.
To what would you attribute this size difference? Do you think the nest didn't have enough food?  


DrWatts-ccb: I have not meant to imply that these chicks are not within the normal size range but merely that they are
less developed than what we typically see lower on the James and elsewhere within the Bay where food appears to be more plentiful.  
Yes, I believe the somewhat lower provisioning rate has slowed their growth but they will do fine in the end.

luxe09: the Vet who looked a R2 noted that he had extra skin on the keel so I wanted to know if it was a problem.
DrWatts-ccb: I felt the birds when they came down from the nest and they were in great condition.  

palee02: It there anything that Dr. Watts learned from this experience, that can be used in the future? ?  
DrWatts-ccb: Yes, not so much about eagles but about people.  You have taught me that a great number of people do still care about eagles and the natural world.  

birdwarden: Are there plans to take pictures when R1 and R2 fledge??  
DrWatts-ccb: Yes, we will take photos periodically and share with the group.

Do eagles recognize their "children" for any length of time? ?  
DrWatts-ccb: Some bird species like crows that maintain strong family groups certainly do recognize relatives and others.  
Some raptors fall into this group of species but I know of no definitive tests of this possibility in bald eagles.  
This is a question that will receive increased interest as the population continues to move to saturation and the likelihood of juveniles returning to their natal territory increases.


Mom doesn't seem as adept at feeding both. Mom has mottled markings high on her tail feathers.
Do you think possibly mom is younger than dad?  Do you think this is the same Mom from the past 10 years?  


DrWatts-ccb: Although we have no way of knowing their age, I agree with you that in terms of skill level
the female does not appear to exhibit the same level of experience.
I have felt through the season that she is likely considerably younger than the male.

skeep125 Do the adults visit the nest after their offspring fledge?

DrWatts-ccb: Association with the nest varies considerably between pairs.  Some pairs here in the Bay roost at their nest or in the tree year round.
This pair does not seem to show that pattern.  They likely roost and spend most of the off season along the river.
This is a typical pattern that we see with pairs that are nesting in areas distant from foraging areas or within urban areas.

how long will fledglings return to birth nest?
Dr. Watts said "In addition to the immediate period following fledging we have growing evidence from banded birds and birds
that we are tracking that they may come back in following years."
Were they to return to the natal nest or to the parents' territory, would they be considered intruders

DrWatts-ccb: My experience with juveniles visiting their natal nest is within the first 3 years.  
I do not know how adults would respond as the birds reach breeding age but my guess is that they would be treated as intruders.

SeeingBirdz:  I saw male eagle enter another nest this year and kill the young. Will the male on another nest accept another chick not his own?

DrWatts-ccb: Intruder males kill chicks to break up nests and by doing so afford themselves a chance of taking the territory.  
Even if the territorial male is gone they will typically kill the chicks because they are unrelated.  
Depending on the timing this may cause the female to recycle so that he can raise his own young.
If a pair has chicks and others are added to the brood they will most often raise them if they are of similar age.  
Fostering has been a long-standing and successful management technique.  

SlimGMC: How many hummingbird nests can fit in an eagle's nest?  
DrWatts-ccb: For an average eagle nest here in the Bay that would be about 50,000 by weight or volume.  
However, I doubt that many could actually be fit in the space.  There is a connection between the two species that most people may not realize.  
As the eaglets get older they shed a tremendous amount of down that covers the nest.  
I have been in several eagle nests as they were visited by hummingbirds, gnatcathers, tanagers and other species collecting down to line their own nests.
Has anyone out there found a nest lined with eagle down?

cndray: What is Dr. Watts favorite eagle memory from his career working with them?

DrWatts-ccb: I have many good memories flying surveys or working in the field with eagles.
In 2004 I climbed into a nest on the Rappahannock that had 2 chicks. Most eaglets avoid eye contact with humans.  
But the youngest of the brood looked deep into my eyes and held my gaze no matter where I moved like a young child yearning for discovery.
That moment has never left me.  To fly along the Bay and see the hand of man moving into every field and woodlot
and not consider the universe of this eaglet is to ignore the deeper parts of ourselves.  

Skyeler: I have long heard and then read for myself Scott Neilsen's account of post mating lethargy in female eagles.
It has been quoted repeatedly as fact, yet Libby said that Dr. Byrd had expressed he had never observed such a thing.
I suspect it may have been an individual reaction in the one nest Mr. Neilsen observed one year.
So, my question is this, do female eagles have a post-mating lethargy as a common behavior? Or might this be an individual response?


DrWatts-ccb: I am not aware of this behavior though it could be brief and subtle.  Females will often fly off immediately after mating.

OK I seemed to have had a rebellious mouse with this question!

RICeagles- I realize that the time would be at least 5 years, but has there ever been a study done that examines
how an eagle’s experience in the nest effect their behavior as parents?


RICeagles- I realize that the time would be at least 5 years, but has there ever been a study done that examines
how an eagle’s experience in the nest effect their behavior as parents?

DrWatts-ccb: I know of no long term study that has examined such behaviors.  
However, I would be very surprised if some of the experiences of the chicks before independence are not carried over to their own breeding.


skeep125 Do the adults visit the nest after their offspring fledge?

DrWatts-ccb: Association with the nest varies considerably between pairs.  Some pairs here in the Bay roost at their nest or in the tree year round.
This pair does not seem to show that pattern.  They likely roost and spend most of the off season along the river.
This is a typical pattern that we see with pairs that are nesting in areas distant from foraging areas or within urban areas.
In response to the question "how long will fledglings return to birth nest?" Dr. Watts said "In addition to the immediate period following fledging we have growing evidence from banded birds and birds that we are tracking that they may come back in following years." Were they to return to the natal nest or to the parents' territory, would they be considered intruders

DrWatts-ccb: My experience with juveniles visiting their natal nest is within the first 3 years.  I do not know how adults would respond as the birds reach breeding age but my guess is that they would be treated as intruders.

1:20 obxbarb: Alright, Dr. Watts is working on a presentation, so I'm going to let him go for now.  Thank you very much for taking time today for us.  We miss the eagles!
1:21 DrWatts-ccb: It has been great to be with you.  Thanks for all of your interest.
1:21 obxbarb: chat unpaused
CJ

Like government, eagle cam intruded too far
April 21, 2012  The RT editor speaks of 'intruding' on baby eagles.
He relates it to government intrusion into our lives to 'help' families feed their children through the food stamp program.
Like the eagle cam, we have unintended consequences.
The eagle parents said, "Heck, why should we feed the children when someone else will?"
We have pushed the parents aside because others think they can do a better job.
Comments Editor, Times-Dispatch
Ron Melancon,  Glen Allen VA  
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...rrespondent-of-the-day-ar-1857970

I wasnt going to post this here but we all need to learn to discern everything, so start here.
He is probably very political - so am I!  I'm just pulling out a couple of his comments I liked because he has a point to make.
He is both right and wrong.  I am not going to make a political statement.
I posted this so y'all wont go all bonkers about this guys comment.  Smile

Ron has made a general judgment about us - and made a foolish comparison to the Richmond eagles.  He has stirred up a hornets nest, unfortunately.
Some who watch cams have jobs, some are ill, or on Social Security which they paid into all their working life.
Some are kids in school classrooms studying nature.

RESPONSE to Ron Melancon April 28, 2012
Male bald eagles faithful to ONE mate?  No!
Eagles and humans both exhibit bad behavior
Editor, Times-Dispatch

Correspondent of the Day Ron Melancon compares feeding the eagle chicks shown on the eagle cam with the government food stamp program,
suggesting both promote dependency. One is free to make his own assessments of the federal food stamp program,
but his facts regarding the eagles are incorrect.

The Center for Conservation Biology placed numerous cameras around eagle nests as part of various scientific studies.
We felt that it was reasonable to use one of the cameras to allow the public to learn something about the eagles.
We were fortunate to be able to partner with The Times-Dispatch to bring this to fruition.
The fact that a million and a half people viewed the site would suggest this goal was achieved.

Unfortunately and inexplicably, the two adults abandoned the nest.
After 2 days biologists decided that supplemental feeding was required.
They were fed twice before the adults returned.

If one really wants to make comparisons between eagle behavior and human behavior, there are many parallels.
We have observed fratricide, cannibalism, starvation and nest abandonment, all traits in our human societies.

We know of at least one case where a male eagle had a female at each of two nests at which
he was providing all the services required to promote successful reproductive activity.
This sounds remarkably akin to bigamy in humans.  (Does that make the NBG male a trigamist - with 3 females?)

The public has long viewed eagles as well as most pairs of other birds, turkeys and others being exceptions,
as being monogamous and altruistic in their behavior. Nothing could be further from the truth.
DNA studies of young in nests and the attendant male of the pair have shown that in some cases as many as
80% of the young do not belong to the male of the pair at the nest.

Dr. Mitchell A. Byrd, retired Chancellor Professor of Biology
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...-letters-to-the-editor-ar-1874861
http://ccb-wm.org/byrdchair/byrdchair_byrd.htm

NBG nest 2012 the male had 3 females and mates with all 3, produced no egg
His mate of several years was killed in April 2011
http://cj.myfreeforum.org/about2340.html
CJ

April 21, 2012  evening
Hoping late this week ustream will have the Richmond eagles back on cam.
We are told it will be from the ground - up - not in a tree.
CJ




April 21, 2012 evening
Hoping late this week ustream will have the Richmond eagles back on cam.
We are told it will be from the ground - up - not in a tree.
Richmond Eagle Cam to return with more-distant view

The popular Richmond Eagle Cam is coming back.
April  25,  2012   Scientists plan to restart the camera in the next few days and show nest views from the ground.
The initial views won't be as dramatic as when the camera was mounted just above the nest,
but they will allow fans to continue to follow Virginia and James and their two chicks.

And in about a month, when the young eagles step out on limbs to flap their wings, the views should be good, said Bryan Watts, director of the Center for Conservation Biology.
"It's always exciting when they get out on their limbs," Watts said.
The chicks, now 5½ weeks old, should fly from the nest in mid-June.

Virginia and James unexpectedly left the nest April 13, so scientists took down the tree-mounted camera the next day to remove anything that might be spooking the birds.
The parents returned April 16.

Scientists on Friday mounted the camera on the ground, next to a house about 25 yards from the nest.
The work took just a few minutes, Watts said. "We were trying to minimize any kind of disturbance."
After some technical adjustments, the camera should be running this week, Watts said.

The Eagle Cam went online Jan. 16 and drew more than 1.5 million page views from more than 130 countries.
The camera is a project of the conservation center and the Richmond Times-Dispatch.
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...to-return-with-more-di-ar-1866556
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/news/local/richmond-eagle-cam


April 24   Scientists will soon restart the Richmond Eagle Cam by showing nest views from the ground.
The initial views won't be as dramatic as when the camera was mounted just above the nest, but they will allow fans to continue to follow Virginia and James and their two chicks.
When the time comes for the young eagles to test their wings and eventually take flight, the views should be better, said Bryan Watts
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...gle-cam-restart-ground-ar-1865084
CJ

April  26,  2012  
Richmond Eagle cam is live again  
Mounted on the ground, the camera began showing the nest of parents and their 2 chicks shortly after 3 pm today.
The Eagle Cam drew 1.5 million viewers from more than 130 countries during a 3 month run that began in mid-January.
Scientists took down the camera April 14 out of concerns that it might be bothering the adults, which left the nest the day before.
The birds returned April 16.

In its current alignment, the camera doesn't offer the dramatic view of looking right down into the nest,
but it shows the side of the nest and the pine limbs around it.
When the chicks start stepping out on limbs in about a month, the new view should be even better than the old one,
said Barbara Slatcher, a volunteer who helps operate the camera.
(That must be obxbarb in chatroom.)
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...d-eagle-cam-is-back-on-ar-1871970
.
CJ

April 27, 2012
I tuned in to our new live cam about 6 am.  
I am glad there is a button to mute some ads!  There is no sound on cam.  Sad

Screen caps #1 and 2 taken at 6:25 am
I saw parent and both chicks.  NOT easy to get pics - they move so fast!
The picture is so still I refreshed thinking it froze, but its fine.  No wind.

7.15 am  parent came in on LEFT side of nest and is probably feeding R2.  Thats my guess.

April 28, 2012
Cam is working fine, no sound.  Its a bit jerky - parents appear and vanish, you dont see them fly.
We get brief and quick glimpses of chicks.  We really dont know who is who but they enjoy guessing.  Wink

Richmond Eagles April 28, 2012 morning feed video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_xjBiCIBzY&feature=youtu.be

Dr Watts will present 'Eagles of the Chesapeake' May 4 from 7-10pm.
Includes dessert reception and a garden night hike. Bring your flashlight!  Cost is $25
Part of NBG Eagle Festival which is May 5
http://www.norfolkbotanicalgarden...ograms-events/calendar/events/633

The cam is now streaming LIVE from the area - at ground level  Smile
http://www.ustream.tv/richmondeagles

Richmond Eagles New Cam Close-Ups 4-30-12 noon
VIDEO
even got Mom on her branch!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ob9447nReRY
CJ

Bald Eagle Chick Development
Eaglet Growth - The young birds grow rapidly, they add one pound to their body weight every 4 or 5 days.
At about two weeks, it is possible for them to hold their head up for feeding.
3 weeks they are 1 foot high and their feet and beaks are very nearly adult size.
4/5 weeks they can to stand, and begin tearing up their own food.
6 weeks, the eaglets are very nearly as large as their parents.
8 weeks, the appetites of the young birds are at their greatest.
While parents hunt almost continuous to feed them, back at the nest the eaglets are beginning to stretch their wings in response to gusts of wind and may even be lifted off their feet for short periods.

3/4 weeks eaglet is covered in its secondary coat of gray down.
In another two weeks or so, black juvenile feathers will begin to grow in.
While downy feathers are excellent insulators, they are useless as air foils, and must be replaced with juvenile feathers before an eaglet can take its first flight, some 10 to 13 weeks after hatching.
http://www.baldeagleinfo.com/eagle/eagle4.html
http://eaglenest.blogs.wm.edu/2011/04/30/bald-eagle-chick-development


Eagles of the World
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g2fPCOhJLvI

Jungle Eagle
http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/episodes/jungle-eagle/full-episode/7324


.
CJ

Typical of me, I listened to the last one first.

Eagles of the Chesapeake: An ecological portrait by Dr Bryan Watts, CCB
Held May 4 - 6, 2012  at NBG (Norfolk Botanical Garden)  Eagle Symposium, Norfolk, Virginia
Other presentations include: The History and Update of the Norfolk Botanical Garden Nesting Eagles by Reese Lukei,
Tracking The Bald Eagle: lessons on foraging, roosting and nesting through satellite telemetry by Libby Mojica,
Emerging Eagle Policies by Ed Clark, Leadership in the Hurricane of Change by Jim Martin and a
Moderated Panel Discussion with Reese Lukei, Jim Martin and Ed Clark.
The Bald Eagle Buddy made his debut appearance with Ed Clark.
http://cj.myfreeforum.org/about3182.html


.
CJ

May 9, 2012  Ustream outage, many live eagle cams down
USA could not access many of the ustream eagle cam nests for hours today.
Explanation here.
http://cj.myfreeforum.org/about3173.html

This blog page 1, Watts, rescue
http://cj.myfreeforum.org/about3100.html

This blog page 2
New cam, Cindy, chat with Watts, Bald Eagle Chick Development
http://cj.myfreeforum.org/ftopic3100-14.php

2012 eagle nesting season, several nests
NBG, Decorah, Minnesota, multiple pages, images
http://cj.myfreeforum.org/about2340.html
CJ

Bald eagle rescue May 31, 2012 - hung up in tree by string.   NOT Richmond nest.
http://www.bclocalnews.com/news/155998305.html

video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMeuO1L6wuQ

Young Richmond Eagle Cam birds nearly ready to fly June 02, 2012
RICHMOND, Va. --
The two Richmond Eagle Cam chicks are about ready to fly on giant wings.
The younger bird, a male called R2, could make the leap today, said eagle expert Bryan Watts. The chick was hopping and lifting itself agilely into the air by his nest Friday afternoon.

"It sure looked like it was begging to go," Watts said.
Big sister R1 might take wing a day or two later, Watts said.

Then again, the chicks might surprise us and wait a little longer. These birds have been all about drama.
Looking like dirty cotton wads after hatching in mid-March, the young birds are now about the same size as parents Virginia and James.
R1, the first hatched, sports a wingspan of about 7 feet. She is a bruiser, about 30 percent larger than R2, whose wings span a mere 6 feet or so.

Eagle Cam viewers got so distressed when R1 viciously pecked R2 in those early weeks that some turned off their computers. The pecking would get worse when R1 was hungry.
The robust health of the chicks now is a testament to the skill of the parents at bringing them fish.

"I think it turned out well, and that means the parents were able to provision both chicks," said Watts, director of the Center for Conservation Biology, a research group.

The Richmond Eagle Cam is a project of the center and the Richmond Times-Dispatch. It has drawn more than 1.7 million page views from more than 100 countries.

Even after the eaglets take to the air, they will get fed by their parents until they learn to fish on their own.
After a few weeks or months, the birds will become independent. They could stay close to Richmond or fly hundreds of miles away.

"Some are homebodies, and some are wanderers," Watts said, "and I don't know why."

The chicks are dark brown. Bald eagles don't get their classic white heads and tails until they are about 5 years old.
After R1 and R2 start looking like mature adults, they will start acting that way, seeking mates and chicks of their own.
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...ds-nearly-ready-to-fly-ar-1959853

NO DOUBT the smaller, younger male fledged first!  Smile
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t0ADZmuPiGY&feature=youtu.be
.
CJ

Richmond Eagles June 3, 2012
R1 sits on a branch to the right of the nest and enjoys the morning sun.. when  R2 lands in the top of the nest tree. He leaves, loops around and eventually lands in the nest tree.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OBvpv0VE7nc&feature=youtu.be

Smallest eaglet takes flight
R2, the youngest and smallest of the two Richmond Eagle Cam chicks, is on the wing.
The male eaglet was perched on a limb beside big sister R1 Saturday when, about 8:05 a.m., he simply launched himself into the air.
"We were all kind of surprised," said Barbara Slatcher,a volunteer who helps run the Eagle Cam. "He just up and left" without any of the usual flapping or wing stretching.

Quoting a teenage Eagle Cam viewer, Slatcher said, "He never even said good-bye."
The fledgling disappeared for about 9 hours — it was a beautiful day for an outing — before returning to the nest tree about 5:20 p.m.
One of the two young eagles made a short flight Friday about 7 p.m. The evening was drizzly and nearly dark, so experts couldn't tell which eagle it was.

The bird made sort of a "trial run" and returned after a few minutes, Slatcher said.
R1 is expected to take flight today or tomorrow. The chicks hatched in mid-March.

As R1 perched near the nest Saturday, one of its parents would occasionally fly by and call to the youngster with a sort of flute-like chuckle.
Even when R1 and R2 are flying, parents Virginia and James will continue to feed them until they learn to catch fish.
The young birds will strike out on their own after a few weeks or months. They could stay around Richmond or wander hundreds of miles away.

The Eagle Cam is a project of the Richmond Times-Dispatch and the Center for Conservation Biology, a research group. It has drawn more than 1.7 million page views from more than 100 countries.
The nest is near the James River in Richmond.
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...st-eaglet-takes-flight-ar-1961639


.
CJ

Richmond Eagles June 4, 2012 Possible R1 flyiing in and then oops
Video recorded at 11:38 am on June 4, 2012. This is possibly R1 returning to the nest tree, then followed by an Adult (who perches for the duration in the top part of the tree) R2 is on a branch near the nest. R1 (?) flies from the top, possibly aiming for the nest, but misses and continues down. At the end of the video, R1 flies, Right to left. Parent remains in the top of the tree.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FpiS1bbE58g

Richmond Eagles June 4, 2012 Intruder
R1 is perched to the left of the trunk, upper portion of tree. An eagle lands in upper right portion of the tree. Parent responds immediately and R1 never moves. at the end, you will see the parent return and perch on a branch.
Cam is sponsored by Center for conservation biology
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ttziS2fQvVQ
CJ



June 5, 2012  Richmond bald eagle family portrait

Another youngster flies; a parent chases away an intruder
June 4   Another day, another flight and fight at the Richmond Eagle Cam nest.
R1, the female larger and older of the two eaglets, took her first official flight Monday — and landed roughly.
About 7:30 a.m. Monday, R1 flew for about 30 seconds then "kind of crashed" into a branch as she landed near the nest.
The bird was OK and took more short flights later in the day.

Later, an intruder eagle flew into the nest tree and got roughed up by a parent eagle.
One of the adults came from out of nowhere and attacked it to get it out of the nest.
The purpose of the late-morning visit was unclear, but some eagles check out nests they might want to take over later.
"I think they are marauding around looking for space," said Bryan Watts, director of the Center for Conservation Biology, a research group.

R2, who flew on Saturday, can wing in and out of the nest like a complete pro.
One of the eaglets flew briefly Friday evening, but experts could not identify it in the darkness and drizzle.  (Most likely R2, the male)
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/new...oungster-flies-a-paren-ar-1965673
CJ

Dr. Bryan Watts Receives Mitchell A. Byrd Award
On May 19, Dr. Bryan Watts received the Mitchell A. Byrd Award for Scientific Achievement during the joint meeting of the Virginia Society of Ornithology and the Tennessee Ornithological Society held in Johnson City, TN. The award recognizes outstanding scientific achievement and contribution to the knowledge of Virginia’s birds. Dr. Watts has produced more than 230 publications, authored nearly 100 papers presented to scientific meetings, and been awarded more than 320 grants to support avian research. The award is named for legendary conservationist and co-founder of the Center for Conservation Biology, Dr. Mitchell A. Byrd.
http://eaglenest.blogs.wm.edu/201...ts-receives-mitchell-a-byrd-award


.
CJ


Richmond VA bald eagles new nest from CCB fb

2013 SEASON
There will be no Richmond nest cam this year.
The parents moved to an island and have been seen by several.

Here are my blogs of past nests - and eagle photographers

2013  HK, Son of NBG, older brother of NX
HK 2009 hatch now establishing his territory, building a nest, and has a girlfriend.
http://cj.myfreeforum.org/about3965.html

2012 NX (Nixy) NBG female has a transmitter.  
She was removed from nest when her mom died and raised at WVC
NX is the kid sister of HK
http://cj.myfreeforum.org/about2186.html

2011  Epitaph for an Eagle
NBG nest and the death of that female which resulted in no more NBG nests permitted  Sad
The NBG male and female were the parents of NX and HK
Eagle's nest removed from Norfolk Botanical Garden October 5, 2012 and there will be deterrents to keep the eagles away.
http://cj.myfreeforum.org/about1921.html

2013 Lucy One Foot at the Blair Wisconsin nest, Eagles4kids
http://cj.myfreeforum.org/about3909.html

2012 Bald Eagle Nesting Season, several nests
http://cj.myfreeforum.org/about2340.html


PHOTOGRAPHERS

Norfolk Botanical Gardens and area local photographers
Photographers sites are fantastic for aging bald eagles.  They show NBG offspring at each age.
Colorings and markings vary a great deal.

Bob Mislan - ShutterBugBob
http://shutterbugbob.smugmug.com/Nature
http://shutterbugbob.smugmug.com/Nature/Eagles-at-Norfolk-Botanical

Pam Monahan
http://pammonahan.smugmug.com/Eag...n-Virginia-Beach/19349792_r56fML#!i=2355541956&k=PfBmNHs

Mike Inman - Mike
http://mikeinman.zenfolio.com

Bill Bauer - Bill
http://www.eagleeyephotographybybillbauer.com

Cary Lynch - Lawtonlyle
http://cjlynch.smugmug.com

Chris7 - (video)
http://www.youtube.com/user/MsChris7100

Dana Lusher - Eaglelover
http://www.danalusherphotos.com

Duane Noblick - Duane
http://duanenoblick.zenfolio.com

Hank - hank
http://www.flickr.com/photos/59092894@N03

Henry Lapo - Falcon64
http://www.lapophoto.com

Jim Roth - Jim
http://www.jimroth.zenfolio.com

Jim - Juggler Jim
http://www.flickr.com/jugglerjim

Merrilyn "Pete" Prucha - VA_RDH
http://www.pbase.com/coastalva

Reese Lukei
He is blogging HK 2009 hatch now establishing his territory, building a nest, and has a girlfriend
http://eaglenest.blogs.wm.edu
CJ

March 2013
Overheard, recorded from a chatroom.

The Richmond nest was a total failure!!
I live in Rich, VA - the whole eagle nest project was a failure!!!!!
poorly planned, and poorly placed.  We have a lot of eagles in the Jamestown area on the James river.
people in Rich were really excited to have their own camera - it was down too much, so we didn't know what was going on.  
We expected one like Norfolk.

          ---------------------

2:50 Nikali: Richmond  Mom and Dad have two thriving eaglets in their new nest! Smile
Nikali: Cpt. Mike THINKS he has seen at ;least one, but no way to tell, not banded
Capt Mike has seen the adults nesting on an island
.
CJ

Virginia & James raised 1 chick in 2013
Their nest is on an island.

http://www.wm.edu/news/stories/20...hmond,-bald-eagles-at-home123.php
https://www.facebook.com/pages/CC...741607187952?hc_location=timeline

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